CRNE June 2012 CRNE June 2012 - pg.4 | allnurses

CRNE June 2012 - page 4

Anyone started to prepare for CRNE June 2012?... Read More

  1. Visit  petethecanuck profile page
    #39 1
    Thanks Alli.. I'm doing the CRNE readiness test right now. Feeling pretty good with everything except for some the nurse-patient relationship stuff

    Yeah I work on a cardiac unit and totally disagree with 4 being the answer in that question. I even resourced my educator and she concurred.

    Good luck in the final week of studying!

    Few last min tips

    -Remember Pt safety: ABC's
    -Nursing process. Assess always before an intervention.
    -Maslow: Physical before psychosocial
    Last edit by petethecanuck on May 30, '12 : Reason: sp
  2. Visit  allicandoispray profile page
    #40 1
    hey everyone,

    i am aware that calculators are not permitted for the exam, i am completely fine with manual calculations when it comes to everything besides for fluid dosages. reason being it usually results in a decimal answer as one typically divides the smaller number from the larger one, and i have difficulty doing that by hand - with a calculator it is very simple and when i do it by hand i usually get the right answer but i am always unsure of my answer. i want to be as confident as i am when i do IV flow rates. can someone assist?

    For instance, can you share step by step how you do this one by hand...

    A client is ordered 5 milligrams of Flupenthixol decanoate by intramuscular injection. 40 milligrams in 2 millilitres of liquid for IM Injection is available. How many millilitres will you administer?

    thanks in advance!
  3. Visit  petethecanuck profile page
    #41 2
    ordered dose / dose on hand x volume = administered volume

    5mg/40mg x 2ml = x

    step 1: lets figure out what 5/40 is by reducing the fraction.

    5 goes into 5: once, therefore numerator is 1
    5 goes into 40: 8 times, therefore denominator is 8

    step 2: now that the fraction is reduced, lets solve it using simple longhand division.


    ____
    8)1

    8 goes into 1: 0 times


    _0___
    8)1

    now we add a 0 to the dividend, and a decimal place in the quotient.

    _0.___
    8)10

    8 goes into 10 once.


    _0.1___
    8)10
    ___8__
    ___2__


    this leaves 2 as the remainder. now we add a 0 to the dividend and carry it down to the remainder
    _0.1___
    8)100
    ___8__
    __20__

    8 goes into 20 twice leaving 4 as the remainder.

    _0.12___
    8)100
    ___8__
    ___20__
    ___16__
    ____4__


    now we add another 0 to the dividend and carry it down to the remainder.

    _0.12___
    8)100
    ___8__
    ___20__
    ___16__
    ____40__


    8 goes into 40 5 times leaving 0 as remainder. we have divided the fraction!

    _0.125___
    8)100
    ___8__
    ___20__
    ___16__
    ____40__
    ____40__
    _____0__


    step 3:

    multiply 0.125 x 2 ml (volume) = 0.25 ml

    ∴ volume administered would be 0.25 ml.
    Last edit by petethecanuck on Jun 2, '12 : Reason: bleh division won't format cleanly.. hope it makes sense :)
  4. Visit  NotReady4PrimeTime profile page
    #42 1
    Wow, that was a very long way around a simple, very basic math problem. 40mg/2mL = 20mg/1 mL and 5mg/20mg = 0.25mL
  5. Visit  jvre888 profile page
    #43 1
    5mg/40mg x 2ml = 0.25ml
  6. Visit  allicandoispray profile page
    #44 0
    i love this place!!

    thank you all! i wanted to know how to do it by hand step by step with accuracy. the fractions made it a whole lot easier, it has been a while! i have been testing myself and have been getting them all correct! i am truly grateful for this community.
  7. Visit  kheemooy profile page
    #45 0
    [QUOTE=allicandoispray;6541360]pete, i agree with you. 1 was my answer as well. I crossed out 4 immediately based on the R-sided HF. shockingly, 4 was the answer. i have done almost 3000 practice questions and this one still bothers me, i am just going to note this one off as an error. the rationale in the book says "elevation of an extremity promotes venous and lymphatic drainage by gravity" and the rationale as to why 1 was wrong is that "this action is taken cautiously and should be the decision of a physician."

    My answer is #4 too. I think among all the options "elevation of legs" is the most independent nursing action/intervention. #1 is also a nursing intervention but it is an dependent nursing action because you need a doctor's order for this. Fluid restriction cannot be implemented just like that without a doctor's order. That's why i thought of #4 coz it is an independent nursing action and it limits spread of edema of the legs.


    what gets me is that there was another similar question just before this question in the same book that states Mr. Mars has CHF and pulmonary edema. Which of the following nursing actions would help to alleviate his respiratory distress?

    1. elevate lower extremities
    2. encourage frequent coughing
    3. place him in an orthopneic position
    4. prepare him for modified postural drainage



    Answer. 3 in case anyone is wondering HOWEVER, the rationale as to why #1 is wrong? (which i crossed out first) is that elevation of extremities should be avoided because it increases venous return, placing an increased workload on the heart! so wouldn't elevating the patient's extremities essentially be contraindicated in patient's with HF? confusing! if anyone agrees with the initial question + answer please share as to why you agree.

    In this case my answer is #3 because the question is more specific about respiratory distress. #2 and #4 are also related to pulmo to but it is for patients who have sputum/mucous in the lungs not for pulmonary edema. On the other hand, elevation of extremities does not increase the blood volume, pitting edema occurs because there is build up of blood in the lower extremities due to ineffective pumping of the heart and eventually there is third space fluid shifting or the fluid leaks to the interstitial space. When there is fluid shifting it is bad and you have to resolve it by elevating the legs so fluid goes back in the intravascular space/veins.

    Hope that answers your question. Goodluck to all June 2012 examinees.
  8. Visit  kheemooy profile page
    #46 0
    Quote from louise1821
    Hi
    I am also studying for the June 2012 exam, I will take it in London, Ontario. I'm studying Mosby CRNE review, and the new edition of Community Health Nursing in Canada, Canadian Fundamentals in Nursing - Potter and doing the CARE CRNE review course here in London. I also did the IEHP course through the ACCESS center - online course, which helped.

    Faithful did I meet you on line at the "Campbell Cohen forum", if so you can see I got my eligibility for CRNE last friday after 10 months.

    Olga

    Hi Olga, I am about to start the review course with CARE in Hamilton on Monday. What are your feedbacks about their workshop? Was it helpful?
  9. Visit  petethecanuck profile page
    #47 0
    Quote from allicandoispray
    i love this place!!

    thank you all! i wanted to know how to do it by hand step by step with accuracy. the fractions made it a whole lot easier, it has been a while! i have been testing myself and have been getting them all correct! i am truly grateful for this community.
    That's what I figured you were asking about which is why I "tried" to show how to do it via the long division method.

    @ Keemooy. #4 is not the answer to that question. #1 is. You wouldn't raise the legs of someone with Rt sided heart failure.
  10. Visit  kheemooy profile page
    #48 0
    Quote from petethecanuck
    That's what I figured you were asking about which is why I "tried" to show how to do it via the long division method.

    @ Keemooy. #4 is not the answer to that question. #1 is. You wouldn't raise the legs of someone with Rt sided heart failure.

    @pete since when has elevation of legs to resolve pitting edema been contraindicated in CHF? one of the nursing care/intervention to resolve edema is elevating the legs. It's always been the first line independent nursing intervention when it comes to peripheral edema.

    can you provide me with your source that elevation of legs in contraindicated with edema in CHF?
  11. Visit  kheemooy profile page
    #49 0
    "2. Elevate extremities except when the client is in acute distress."

    Congestive Heart Failure, Planning/Implementation. Mosby's Canadian Comprehensive Review of Nursing p. 115
  12. Visit  petethecanuck profile page
    #50 0
    Exactly. Please re-read the question:

    Mr. Del Ray is experiencing an acute exacerbation of right sided heart failure. Which of the following independent nursing actions should the nurse implement to limit spread of Mr. Del Ray's ankle edema?

    1. Restricting his fluids
    2. Applying elastic bandages
    3. Performing range-of-motion exercises
    4. Elevating his legs
  13. Visit  kheemooy profile page
    #51 0
    Okay, well not because it said "exacerbation" doesn't mean it has pulmo distress already. just stick to the question pls. don't over analyze. and besides it says "independent nursing action" and in addition, elevation of legs is more specific to ankle edema compared to restriction of fluids.

    and lastly, since the question was taken from the prep guide it means that it's the CNA's answer. CNA who are the makers of the exam. so no matter how you disagree with it, in the end it still depends on their answers. and we can do nothing about that.

    anyways if you provide with factual and book based source, then i will be convinced. i still stick to my answer and i have my sources.
    Last edit by NotReady4PrimeTime on Jun 3, '12

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