Past DUI?

  1. 1 Does anyone know if having a DUI in the past will make getting an RN or a job in the health care field impossible or difficult?

    One hears rumors, but I'm looking for information on any barriers that may come up because of a stupid mistake in my past.

    Thanks.
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  3. Visit  phxgoddess profile page

    About phxgoddess

    From 'Phoenix, Arizona'; Joined May '04; Posts: 15; Likes: 1.

    14 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  Blackcat99 profile page
    1
    I knew an RN who has a past DUI. She never had trouble getting a job. However, she told me she had to do a bunch of extra paperwork because of it. Good luck
    cabaile likes this.
  5. Visit  traumaRUs profile page
    0
    You need to contact the Board of Nursing in the state where you want to be licensed. Doing this early, will hopefully save you a lot of problems later on. Good luck.
  6. Visit  phxgoddess profile page
    0
    I sent an email to the Arizona State Board of Nursing.
    This was the reply:

    [font='Times New Roman']DUI?

    It depends. When you apply for licensure in AZ you have to answer 2 questions: Are you currently under investigation or is a disciplinary action pending against your nursing license or CNA certificate in any state or territory of the US? AND . . . have you ever been convicted, entered a plea of guilty, nolo contendre or no contest, or have you ever been sentenced, served time in jail or prison, or had probation or sentence deferred in any felony or undesignated offense? If you respond with a "yes", your application will be reviewed.



    We also require fingerprints. If the report comes back positive, you will also be reviewed. It depends on the number of DUI's you may have had, when did the DUI occur, are there other indicators indicating that alcohol may be a problem, etc, etc. There is not a simple answer for your question, but hope that this helps.



    Good Morning:

    When that person renews or applies for license, there is a question on the renewal or application that asks?

    "Have you ever been convicted, entered a plea of guilty, nolo contendre or no contest, or have you ever been sentenced, served time in jail or prison, or had probation or sentence deferred in any felony or undesignated offense?

    If yes answer, provide a written explanation of the details of each conviction and sentence. Return the written explanation, a copy of the police report and court documents for each conviction, indicating type of conviction, conviction date and sentence including the date of absolute discharge of the sentence for each felony conviction with your application. If you answer "yes" to this question, your application or renewal will not be processed until you provide proof that it has been more than 5 years since the sentence for each felony conviction has been completed or provide proof that the conviction was designated a misdemeanor."

    So if they were on probation, the date they could apply would be 5 years after the date of absolute discharge from the probation. The Bd considers applicants with felony convictions over 5 years from the date of absolute discharge on a case-by-case basis. There is not a simple answer to your question, but hope this helps.
  7. Visit  buggyboo profile page
    0
    Do you know what type of screening process the Board uses to determine if one is alcohol dependent and how long they can withhold licensure? Also, what if DUI charges have been dropped to reckless driving? Although that is a midemeanor, it is at least not alcohol related. Is one able to be fingerprinted if convicted of DUI charges? It seems one stupid mistake can risk a career and dedication of hard work in school. I also was not too bright one evening and am looking for any advice..
  8. Visit  buggyboo profile page
    0
    The above response was meant for anyone to reply but particularly to PHXGoddess..
  9. Visit  phxgoddess profile page
    0
    I was able to get my fingerprint clearance, but it has a driving restriction on it.

    I can only direct you towards the Arizona Board for any further questions.
    (if you are in AZ. If not - contact your state board)

    http://www.azboardofnursing.org/

    [font=Tahoma]arizona@azbn.org
    [font=Tahoma]or Main Line: ( 602 ) 889-5150



  10. Visit  caroladybelle profile page
    0
    Numerous threads on this.

    For more information use "search", there should be plenty of info.
  11. Visit  buggyboo profile page
    0
    Thanks for your help. I will contact AZ Board for further questions. Just curious, how does the driving restrictions show on your license and why would that have a negative effect? I will also locate the search button and review other threads as suggested. Again, thanks for the advice..
  12. Visit  yellowsunshine profile page
    0
    I came from another state in 2004 with a DUI from 2000. The Board put me on probation for 1 year, limited my ability to work, requires weekly attendance to nurse recovery meetings, evaluations for relapse, weekly AA attendance. At the end of the year probation I can submit a request for a hearing to have my license re-evaluated. They decide whether or not to extend the probation. Also, monthly drug testing. One of the nurses in my nurse recovery meetings was in a car accident and in a coma/ICU for a month. When she was released, the board informed her that her probation would be extended for 6 months because she received controlled substances during hospital stay, and missed her AA, and nurse recovery meetings. I guess I feel sometimes, that the nursing board, or some of the employees of are very hardened people, without much heart left. People do make mistakes in life. I don't know anyone perfect, But even God forgives. I was told that According to the board once your license has been put on probation, even after discharge, it can be very difficult to become licensed in other states. The validity of this statement I don't know, but if it is true it makes me feel that this will follow me for the rest of my life. Most of us who have made mistakes feel alot of remorse. I feel that I will have to explain this mistake for the rest of my life. Has anyone had any experiences with this? Will it always be this bad. The DUI happened in 2000, after my son was killed in a car accident. I lost it. How long to you have to pay for mistakes?
  13. Visit  caroladybelle profile page
    0
    Quote from yellowsunshine
    I came from another state in 2004 with a DUI from 2000. The Board put me on probation for 1 year, limited my ability to work, requires weekly attendance to nurse recovery meetings, evaluations for relapse, weekly AA attendance. At the end of the year probation I can submit a request for a hearing to have my license re-evaluated. They decide whether or not to extend the probation. Also, monthly drug testing. One of the nurses in my nurse recovery meetings was in a car accident and in a coma/ICU for a month. When she was released, the board informed her that her probation would be extended for 6 months because she received controlled substances during hospital stay, and missed her AA, and nurse recovery meetings. I guess I feel sometimes, that the nursing board, or some of the employees of are very hardened people, without much heart left. People do make mistakes in life. I don't know anyone perfect, But even God forgives. I was told that According to the board once your license has been put on probation, even after discharge, it can be very difficult to become licensed in other states. The validity of this statement I don't know, but if it is true it makes me feel that this will follow me for the rest of my life. Most of us who have made mistakes feel alot of remorse. I feel that I will have to explain this mistake for the rest of my life. Has anyone had any experiences with this? Will it always be this bad. The DUI happened in 2000, after my son was killed in a car accident. I lost it. How long to you have to pay for mistakes?
    How long do you have to pay for mistakes.....the answer is as long as it takes.

    Yes, G-d forgives...but the BON is not required to.

    The BON in most states is somewhat hardened. They have had to listen to excuse after excuse after excuse for illegal behavior by nurses. They hold patient safety in their hands and would have guilt on their conscious if they licensed someone who then harms a patient.

    Will it affect future licensing? Yes. I had a speeding ticket in 1987 that some states will require me to report and provide references for. You will be having to provide these explanations for a very long time.

    And, quite bluntly, having a loved one die in a vehicular accident, for many people, would have provided the impetus to NOT drive under the influence. How would you have felt if you had killed someone? Would it have been okay for their family members to drive under the influence and kill more people?

    I am very sympathetic to the issues that led to this, as I am sure that the BON is, but you cannot use it to excuse dangerous behavior. And trust me, if the BON hears ANY excuses coming from you, no matter how valid you think that they are, they will be even less likely to allow you to regain your licensure.

    This may sound harsh, but own your mistakes and resolve not to commit them again. No "everyone makes mistakes", or "everyone does it, they just don't get caught". What "everyone" does, doesn't matter...it is what you do that matters in regards to licensing.
  14. Visit  phxgoddess profile page
    0
    Dear Yellowsunshine,

    Thank you for sharing your story and for being so open.
    I'm at a loss for words on what to say. There is nothing anyone can say to take away the pain of a loss such as yours.

    I am now in my final semester at ASU, graduation in December, so I will find out very soon just what it will take for me to attain my license in this state.

    I spoke to advisors at the College of Nursing before starting my pre-reqs and again as I applied to the program. I was honest about my DUI - and was told both times, "no problem." I understand the college is there to make money, but it would have helped to have more facts. It always helps to be as prepared as possible.

    I understand that I am not done paying for my "mistake" and that it is something that will be in my background the rest of my life. I've been very open and honest about my experience with friends and family in hopes they understand how dangerous it is - and how easy it is. It really only takes two drinks. I accept the responsiblitiy for what I did that night, but it is hard to understand how judgemental other people can be. I guess it is one of those things you have to accept or tolerate without needing to understand it. People are people; I can't judge them.

    As for school and my own future -- I'm one of those "40-somethings" who chose to return to college and chase a dream after raising my daughters. It hasn't been easy, but life isn't always easy. Both of my daughters are in college and I will be graduating soon. This is what I'm looking at right now.
    I've worked really hard and my eyes are on the goal.

    Also, I'm preparing a letter to ask for direction and assistance. I've always planned to self-report and take whatever action is needed. It is scary and the story you told sounds so cold and unfair. I just hope I can face it all with strength and grace.

    Thank you again for your honesty and for taking the time to reply to this thread.

    phxgoddess
  15. Visit  yellowsunshine profile page
    0
    Please Don't misunderstand. I own up to my own mistakes and decisions made leading up to them. All I am trying to say is once the mistake is made it is very hard to overcome no matter what the reason may be. The BON can be very hardened as are many nurses that work, which is very unfortunate. There are no excuses for things that happen sometimes, just as there is no excuse for the nurse that doesn't double check her meds and makes a fatal mistake. There are alot of nurses who may think that they are the "perfect" nurse. There is no such thing. As people in general we are always striving to better ourselves personally and professionally. (For most of us) Unfortunately we sometimes choose the wrong decisions and pay dearly for them. Drinking after the loss of my son is not an excuse. It was a wrong decision and it was a mistake. I had never even tasted alcohol before this happened. I was looking for something to take the pain away. I looked the wrong way. A wrong decision. If there are people who have never been in dire circumstances and made a wrong decision in whatever part of life that may be my hat is off to you. Being judgemental and putting yourself "above" someone else is something I try not to do. It seems that once I do that I end up understanding their situation by being put in their shoes or knowing someone close to me who has been.
    Quote from caroladybelle
    How long do you have to pay for mistakes.....the answer is as long as it takes.

    Yes, G-d forgives...but the BON is not required to.

    The BON in most states is somewhat hardened. They have had to listen to excuse after excuse after excuse for illegal behavior by nurses. They hold patient safety in their hands and would have guilt on their conscious if they licensed someone who then harms a patient.

    Will it affect future licensing? Yes. I had a speeding ticket in 1987 that some states will require me to report and provide references for. You will be having to provide these explanations for a very long time.

    And, quite bluntly, having a loved one die in a vehicular accident, for many people, would have provided the impetus to NOT drive under the influence. How would you have felt if you had killed someone? Would it have been okay for their family members to drive under the influence and kill more people?

    I am very sympathetic to the issues that led to this, as I am sure that the BON is, but you cannot use it to excuse dangerous behavior. And trust me, if the BON hears ANY excuses coming from you, no matter how valid you think that they are, they will be even less likely to allow you to regain your licensure.

    This may sound harsh, but own your mistakes and resolve not to commit them again. No "everyone makes mistakes", or "everyone does it, they just don't get caught". What "everyone" does, doesn't matter...it is what you do that matters in regards to licensing.


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