LPN's In AZ

  1. Is there any point in getting my LPN first? What type of nursing environments do they work in? Does anyone know what the general pay is???
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  2. 9 Comments

  3. by   cardiacRN2006
    Lots of good reasons to get your LPN.
    First, you get to sit for the NCLEX. I read a report a year or so ago that said those who sat for the NCLEX-PN passed the NCLEX-RN at a 100% average.
    Second you will get real nursing experience. Charting, passing meds, interacting with doctors, advocating for patients. Invaluable experience.

    Here in Tucson, lots of hospitals have LPNs. I know of at least 3 hospitals in town where LPNs are the primary nurse. They come in and take assignments, and do the work-they aren't used as aides or assistants. Also, I know of another hospital where they use LPNs in L&D as the baby's nurse.

    And lastly, God forbid, something happen in 3rd or 4th semester where you can't complete the program, or you fail, or whatever. If you are an LPN, you can re-enter almost any program and complete the program, or you can find transition LPN-BSN programs.
  4. by   sassiebaz
    Quote from cardiacRN2006
    Lots of good reasons to get your LPN.
    First, you get to sit for the NCLEX. I read a report a year or so ago that said those who sat for the NCLEX-PN passed the NCLEX-RN at a 100% average.
    Second you will get real nursing experience. Charting, passing meds, interacting with doctors, advocating for patients. Invaluable experience.

    Here in Tucson, lots of hospitals have LPNs. I know of at least 3 hospitals in town where LPNs are the primary nurse. They come in and take assignments, and do the work-they aren't used as aides or assistants. Also, I know of another hospital where they use LPNs in L&D as the baby's nurse.

    And lastly, God forbid, something happen in 3rd or 4th semester where you can't complete the program, or you fail, or whatever. If you are an LPN, you can re-enter almost any program and complete the program, or you can find transition LPN-BSN programs.
    Thank you for your input, it helps me in my decision making!
  5. by   misty78
    Would you beable to tell me what hospital has LPN's in the L&D? Thats where I want to work. I just passed my LPN boards this month and were planning on moving out to Az in May and I would like to work for awhile while I wait to get into school for my RN
  6. by   PhoenixGirl
    Misty- I know Del Webb uses LPNs in their L&D unit, but I think it's a very hard position to get. They use this position to help transition after mom has had baby and baby is stable. But I only saw one per shift and I imagine the person probably had to get very lucky to get the spot.

    Rebecca
  7. by   squirrel 70
    Hello this is good news to know I am a new student and will be looking for a LPN to BSN program is it possible to work and attend a school like this
  8. by   Stormikris
    Any LPN's in the Tucson area?? would love as much information as you have about working here. I am new to nursing in the States. Thank you.
  9. by   arual56
    Quote from Stormikris
    Any LPN's in the Tucson area?? would love as much information as you have about working here. I am new to nursing in the States. Thank you.

    I am a new LPN but have lived my entire life in Tucson. It depends greatly on the hospital as to where LPN's are being hired, and remember that it goes in waves. The unit that is accepting LPN's now, may not be hiring in 6 months saying that they do not use LPN's, even though you may be working for them in that capacity. Like any other position, it depends on the actions of the other LPN's as to whether we are perceived as nurses or glorified PCTs. The hospital I work in uses LPN's on our Rehab unit, and is beginning to us LPN's on Med/Surg. I work in ED, but started there as a PCT and I am still in school to gain my RN. Our ED does not normally use LPN's but is working with those of us still in school, and may be changing their attitude toward hiring LPN's instead of PCT since IV certified LPN's can start lines, and can help with our hold patients when necessary. I have friends in other hospitals and we have found one thing to be true across the board. It depends on the facility you work in, not the state board regulations, as to what they will allow you to do in your practice. And since you are working under the RN's license, you have to set your own limits as to what you are willing to do. Some RN's are lazy and will push everything off on you if allowed. Others are less trusting of you, and you must show them that you know your stuff. Just be sure that you are working within your scope of practice per the state board, and within the facility policies. Heads up. The only level 1 trauma in Tucson is UMC. St. Mary's, St. Joseph's, and Tucson Heart are all sister facilities. El Dorado is now closed. If there is anything else I can tell you, please let me know.
  10. by   Stormikris
    Thanks for the info... I often have to watch my scope... Back in Canada the RN school that I went to didn't teach people how to start IV's... bad practice really but there was IV teams on all the floors that we did practicums on, so I guess the curriculum figured that it was an unnecessary skill. So then I challenged the LPN exam there so often had to watch my scope because I was used to the Nursing student scope. Fast forward to now.... me about to get a job here in the states, where I have little clue besides what I needed to study for the NCLEX as to what my role is. Also, some jobs want IV or phlebotomy (we had lab techs that did this) skills. I hope I don't get in over my head going to work somewhere in town. I'm a quick learner though so I'm sure that will help me through this transition period. I got my green card today so I'll be going into places on Tuesday to apply for work....I am nervous to say the least.
  11. by   arual56
    Quote from Stormikris
    Thanks for the info... I often have to watch my scope... Back in Canada the RN school that I went to didn't teach people how to start IV's... bad practice really but there was IV teams on all the floors that we did practicums on, so I guess the curriculum figured that it was an unnecessary skill. So then I challenged the LPN exam there so often had to watch my scope because I was used to the Nursing student scope. Fast forward to now.... me about to get a job here in the states, where I have little clue besides what I needed to study for the NCLEX as to what my role is. Also, some jobs want IV or phlebotomy (we had lab techs that did this) skills. I hope I don't get in over my head going to work somewhere in town. I'm a quick learner though so I'm sure that will help me through this transition period. I got my green card today so I'll be going into places on Tuesday to apply for work....I am nervous to say the least.
    Good luck on the job hunting. Just be sure to look carefully at every offer you get. And just an FYI, TMC has a bad rep for hiring at a really good salary and then laying you off 6-8 weeks later. They recently bought another hospital in town (El Dorado) with the intent of turning it into a long term facility. Needless to say, the new facility isn't open, TMC has just laid off a significant number of ancillary staff members, and is having to push the opening of their newest hospital down near Vail, that what supposed to open 2008, back to 2011. BE CAREFUL! I'm off the next couple of days. If you have questions or I can help, let me know.

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