Online vs Classroom Graduate School for NPs

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    I teach a generic BSN nursing program in an upper level college. We are slowly although much sooner than we all prefer converting to online teaching. Does anyone have an opinion on which avenue of teaching is more efficient, especially for NPs?
    Phoenix2010

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  2. 9 Comments...

  3. 0
    From a student's perspective, on line is a very expensive, self taught MSN degree where excessive tuition charged did not begin to equal what I got back from the university. On line is NO substitute for in class learning. On line is "one size fits all" and has no accomodation for students who might not have had as much recent hands on experience as other students in the class but who easily qualified to be accepted into their program. This can also happen with an on-site classroom situation but there, you can recognize and act upon targeting your own individual needs much earlier in the program and not be "OK" until the last semester where they weed out "the different" students after taking your tuition with no problems noted until then. I could go on forever. I am not into bashing the university but for a total tab of 122K, I expected a better quality experience. I studied my a-- off and graduated, passed Boards but with no support from the university from my last semester on. If you aren't one size fits all, forget on line.
    Hope this helps. Good Luck to you!
    Last edit by KJLewis on Jul 3, '10 : Reason: needed to clarify some points
  4. 0
    Thank you for your reply. You have made a lot of good points, and I agree with most all of them. The problems which you talked about in your post are the same ones I experienced in my online graduate degree. I have also taught via webCT in a psychiatric master's level course, the only face to face contact I had with any of my students was during orientation. Unfortunately I think this is the wave of the future which we cannot stop.
    Thanks again,
    Phoenix2010
  5. 0
    Quote from KJLewis
    From a student's perspective, on line is a very expensive, self taught MSN degree where excessive tuition charged did not begin to equal what I got back from the university. On line is NO substitute for in class learning. On line is "one size fits all" and has no accomodation for students who might not have had as much recent hands on experience as other students in the class but who easily qualified to be accepted into their program. This can also happen with an on-site classroom situation but there, you can recognize and act upon targeting your own individual needs much earlier in the program and not be "OK" until the last semester where they weed out "the different" students after taking your tuition with no problems noted until then. I could go on forever. I am not into bashing the university but for a total tab of 122K, I expected a better quality experience. I studied my a-- off and graduated, passed Boards but with no support from the university from my last semester on. If you aren't one size fits all, forget on line.
    Hope this helps. Good Luck to you!
    What school did you go to? I have found that the classes are harder online because you are teaching yourself. We do have lectures online. My school also has a campus based FNP program and I would prefer if they would put those lectures online, it would help us to learn more of the information. I am doing fine but during our breaks, I go back and re read over my notes to try to tie everything together. I was told that everything really comes together when we are actually practicing.
  6. 0
    I have done a BSN, MSN and two post-MSN certificates since 2002 and most of it was online.

    Some of it was good and useful, other classes were a waste of time and money.

    For me, I wanted real world examples and experiences - important in the APN role. I also found that in clinicals I would have rather had more interaction with my advisor and other classmates. Although we had a list of preceptors and fortunatly I knew many of them, I still felt a disconnect with the school and didn't feel I learned as much as I needed.
  7. 1
    I like online learning I can get straight to the point and skip all the blah blah blah of lecture I can call or email my teacher when I have questions
    4evernrs likes this.
  8. 0
    I am completing my MSN online this February. I attended 2 different schools, one was more student focused than the other, both provided instructors that were more than qualified and showed a real interest inthe success of the students. Those in my classes were assigned Advisors who checked in on us throughout the classes not just at the end. If any of us were having problems we had access to our advisors and instructors. Instructors responded within the 24-48 hr time frame and were available by phone and email. The cost was a little more than the brick and mortar, however for me it is worth it. For those student whose backgrounds were not at the level where they could really function without the close review and handson approach found in the on campus programs, there are tutoring options associated online as well as on campus. Choosing online programs requires a person to really know his/her weaknesses. nanacarol
  9. 0
    Quote from Phoenix2010
    I teach a generic BSN nursing program in an upper level college. We are slowly although much sooner than we all prefer converting to online teaching. Does anyone have an opinion on which avenue of teaching is more efficient, especially for NPs?
    Phoenix2010


    I completed my MSN partially online and partially in the classroom. I think online education is comparable if you are dedicated to your studies. I moved a lot so online worked for me because I could study anywhere and I would practice (train and work as an RN) at the same time in whatever state I was in. My ideal would have been class in person all the time because that was how I was used to learning (online learning for my generation was foreign). Nevertheless, I finished, got board certified and did just fine in the end.
  10. 0
    Nanacarol, What school were you talking about in your post? I am seeking one that is very student focused and more interested in my success than in weeding students out. That is so old school to me and makes it about them, but I am paying for the education. I really prefer online. I did my BSN online and did very well. 3.7 GPA online and graduated with Distinction. I like the freedom I have online. You get waterhosed in the brick and morter schools too. Reading old Power Points from the year before word for word rather than lecturing was very common in my on campus Grad program. I still wonder what we paid for if they don't lecture and do not actually teach leaving it up to us to teach ourselves. The faculty were very unavailable as most had a practice in a nearby clinic but also worked some at the SON. We were the second job. I was rather disappointed in that I had higher expectations than I found. I am seeking an online MSN program that has my best interest and success as their goal. I may be seeking a ghost too. Barinbass
  11. 0
    I did online through Ball State and I loved it. I have heard good and bad things about both online and live programs. I think the most important thing is online you have to be willing to help teach yourself, Very self motivated. But I think by finding a credible university either way you will be fine.


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