Masters in Midwifery with no nursing experience help!?

  1. 0
    I'm a little more than halfway through undergrad studying Psychology and I just recently realized that midwifery is my calling. I know SUNY Downstate takes students with no nursing background, but that's really limiting to only have one school option.

    Should I become an RN or do an accelerated BSN program? It's too late for me to transfer to nursing school, so I'll graduate in May 2015 with a BS in Psych.

    What's the best option for me?
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  4. 6 Comments so far...

  5. 1
    Suny Downstate, if I am not mistaken, takes students with no RN degree into their MIDWIFE program. Very different from a NURSE MIDWIFE.

    A nurse midwife is a type of APRN and is recognized in all 50 states. You can work in the hospital, bill insurance, write prescriptions, order tests, etc.

    A midwife is a non-nurse direct entry type program. They are NOT recognized as healthcare providers in all states, cannot usually bill insurance (must be self pay), cannot write prescriptions, cannot order labs, and usually cannot get hospital privileges (at home, self pay birth only). Sometimes they are sued for "practicing medicine without a license"
    mamagui likes this.
  6. 0
    If you're interested in nurse-midwifery, as opposed to becoming a Certified Professional Midwife, I know there are several direct-entry nurse-midwifery programs that have you complete an accelerated BSN program before beginning the midwifery curriculum. Yale's program is one of them. I would recommend bringing this up in the Certified Nurse Midwives board, as well, since the knowledgebase about programs is going to be a lot more in-depth there than it is in the general APRN section.

    Good luck!
  7. 0
    To become a Certified Nurse Midwife, you will need to be an RN. You don't necessarily have to have a BSN for this title, as you can go to a community college and get an ADN. There are some schools that have an ADN-MSN program, but many will require you to already have a BS/BA in some other field, which it sounds like you are already about to have.

    Philadelphia University | Midwifery*Admissions Requirements

    DNP Bachelor's & ADN to MSN+DNP (Bridge) Application Steps | Frontier Nursing University
  8. 0
    Quote from futureeastcoastNP
    Suny Downstate, if I am not mistaken, takes students with no RN degree into their MIDWIFE program. Very different from a NURSE MIDWIFE. A nurse midwife is a type of APRN and is recognized in all 50 states. You can work in the hospital, bill insurance, write prescriptions, order tests, etc. A midwife is a non-nurse direct entry type program. They are NOT recognized as healthcare providers in all states, cannot usually bill insurance (must be self pay), cannot write prescriptions, cannot order labs, and usually cannot get hospital privileges (at home, self pay birth only). Sometimes they are sued for "practicing medicine without a license"
    This is not accurate futureeastcoastnp. You are thinking of certified professional midwives (CPMs). You're right that CPMs are only recognized in some states and primarily attend home births, but the SUNY downstate program is not a program to become a CPM but a Certified Midwife CM, which is a credential created by the American College of Nurse Midwives. It was the ACNMs answer to direct entry midwifery at the university level. It requires a number of science prereqs but no RN to do the program. It's a two year masters of science in midwifery and at the end you sit for the identical exam as CNMs and if you pass are awarded the CM. Unfortunately the credential hasn't found a place in many states. Currently it's recognized in NY, NJ and RI. In those states it is viewed as identical to the CNM and they are viewed as health care providers and have all the same privileges (prescription writing, lab ordering/interpretation, etc) and can work in hospitals, birth centers or in the home. The obvious downside is that currently, you'd be limited to work in one of those three states. There is a grassroots group that is working to promote the credential since so many aspiring midwives (myself included) have no interest in nursing. SUNY Downstate has an excellent reputation and has both the CM program and the CNM program. Students in both groups overlap significantly.

    http://www.midwife.org/The-Credential-CNM-and-CM
    Last edit by CNMidwife2Be on Mar 15
  9. 0
    Quote from midwifetobe92
    I'm a little more than halfway through undergrad studying Psychology and I just recently realized that midwifery is my calling. I know SUNY Downstate takes students with no nursing background, but that's really limiting to only have one school option. Should I become an RN or do an accelerated BSN program? It's too late for me to transfer to nursing school, so I'll graduate in May 2015 with a BS in Psych. What's the best option for me?
    Hi midwifetobe92!

    I was in exactly your shoes several years ago. I was a French major and realized that I wanted to be a midwife. I didn't listen to my intuition right away though and it took me a couple years after college until I realized I just needed to follow my heart.

    I completed the prereqs and then did an accelerated BSN - one year, incredibly intense and full of culture shock. Much of it felt irrelevant as an aspiring midwife, but two years after I now see the value in those experiences. I had no interest in working as a nurse and went directly into my program at Frontier Nursing U. It's the oldest midwifery program in the country and I'm very happy w it. I'll be graduating in late 2015. : )

    I also nearly attended SUNY Downstates CNM program - another excellent option.

    See my response above about the CM program. I nearly did that early on in the process but ruled it out bc I didn't want to be limited to 3 states.

    Since you will have your BA by next spring, Id encourage you to take the same route I did and do an accelerated BSN/RN when you finish college.They're all about a year and it goes by fast. It's super intense, but it's worth it.

    Doing an ADN/RN is an option but more circuitous..it's only worth it if it's much cheaper than the ABSNs in your area. You'd then be limited to a smaller number of schools bc they don't all have an ADN- MSN in midwifery. Although frontier does, so that would be an option.

    As far as selecting an ABSN goes, I'd recommend you look for a state school. Don't spend a ton of money. By the end, it's an expensive process and not worth spending a ton for a private nursing program when you're interest is really in midwifery. Are you in NY? I did my ABSN at a SUNY school and was quite happy w it (well, as happy as one can be in an accelerated nursing program..)

    Are you able to start the science prerequisites now? Also, I'd encourage you to do a doula training (CAPPA or DONA are both good). And see if you can do some volunteer doula work - some hospitals have programs otherwise you could do it privately. This will not only give you valuable experience and exposure to birth it will also be a helpful addition on your résumé. Frontier, for example, accepts students w either a year of RN experience (any kind, not just L&D) or a year of mother-child health work (doula, childbirth educator, or lactation consultant/educator).

    I hope this helps! Feel free to send more questions my way, here or PM. : )
  10. 0
    Here's a list of ABSNs - it's from 2011, so it may not be up to date. http://www.aacn.nche.edu/leading-ini...ces/APLIST.PDF

    Also here's a list of midwifery programs. The ones that say BA/BS to RN/CNM are masters entry programs which combine an accelerated year of nursing w the masters in nurse- midwifery. The benefit to these programs is that the process is streamlined, you don't need to apply to another program after nursing school. The major downside is that they tend to be extremely overpriced. Feel free to PM me about individual programs as I've looked into most of them.

    http://www.midwife.org/Education-Programs-Directory

    Lastly, check out this page: futuremidwives.org It's a new organization designed to connect aspiring/student midwives. : )
    Last edit by CNMidwife2Be on Mar 15


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