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Work contract before school

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Has any one gotten a contract with a group before even starting school? What are the pros and cons? There is a slight chance that I might be able to secure a job before I even start school and have the group pay the tuition. This seems financially advantageous but it will limit my choices of work to just one following graduation.

Any thoughts?

FLTraumaRN

Specializes in Trauma ER and ICU...SRNA now. Has 14 years experience.

I would look over the contract very closely. I would personally rather have loans than sign early. What if you don't like the group, or they aren't crna friendly. I have also heard that some students end up not liking the kinds of cases they thought they would before school. It really limits you. Plus, it can also limit your income after school.

Some things I would look for in a contract:

can you break it? what's the penalty? what percent interest do you owe them if you don't complete it? I heard as high as 19% on some contracts. Do they guarantee you a job? There is a univeristy where I am that offers contracts to crna's to work in their 2 hospitals after school. But, reading the fine print it states that they don't have to offer you a job. You have to apply and interview with everyone else. Plus, if you don't get a job with them, 18% interest starting 30 days after you graduate. Not after you are licensed and working.

Just wanted to give you some things to think about. I have spoken with a group here, but look at signing with them as a last financial resort. Plus, they give better sign on bonuses than they offer to pay for school.

Good luck on your decisions

Xbox Live Addict

Specializes in LTC/SNF, Psychiatric, Pharmaceutical. Has 8 years experience.

Has any one gotten a contract with a group before even starting school? What are the pros and cons? There is a slight chance that I might be able to secure a job before I even start school and have the group pay the tuition. This seems financially advantageous but it will limit my choices of work to just one following graduation.

Any thoughts?

I'd be hesistant to sign any contract with any employer. If the environment proves to be toxic, you're stuck unless you want to pay back all the money they gave you d/t breach of contract. There's no such thing as a sure deal in nursing, and things can go bad at any time. This is just my opinion. If this looks like a good enough place to make a long-term commitment too, and has plenty of different areas for you to practice in, then it may be worth it for you.

loveanesthesia

Specializes in CRNA.

Questions to ask?

Do you have to repay the money if they don't have a position for you when you graduate?

What happens if you decide you don't want to work for them? You may not because you find out their pay is low, working conditions aren't what you want etc.

How long is your work committement? Think hard before you go longer than 2 years. Let's say the group you sign with won't let you do any regional anesthesia, if you go longer than 2 years it's difficult to get your skills back. It's very difficult for you to know what kind of position you want now, you don't know enough about anesthesia to judge.

Why are they having trouble hiring? They must be, otherwise they wouldn't take the risk of dealing with someone who has never given an anesthetic. Occasionally they sign someone because of personal knowledge, and know you are a great risk, but if they will do this for anyone, then I'd want to know what the deal is. Also some locations are just very short of CRNAs and that can be a legitimate reason.

My impression is many people who sign before school, don't go where they signed and pay off the money.

PM me and I'll tell you my experience

Here's a bit more information:

The facility that I am negotiating with does not currently have a CRNA program but is planning on hiring CRNAs and AAs. I have a good rapport with the anesthesiologists and have had very positive dialogues with several directors and the chairman. We haven't talked details about the contract or even if it's a possibility yet.

The anesthesia group is affiliated with a medical school, which may allow me lateral movement to work with a variety of patients in different settings. Of course, I don't know that for certain. Then again, nothing is for certain until it is in writing.

Now what do you all think?

loveanesthesia

Specializes in CRNA.

Here's a bit more information:

The facility that I am negotiating with does not currently have a CRNA program but is planning on hiring CRNAs and AAs. I have a good rapport with the anesthesiologists and have had very positive dialogues with several directors and the chairman. We haven't talked details about the contract or even if it's a possibility yet.

The anesthesia group is affiliated with a medical school, which may allow me lateral movement to work with a variety of patients in different settings. Of course, I don't know that for certain. Then again, nothing is for certain until it is in writing.

Now what do you all think?

If they are going to hire AAs and CRNAs, then your practice will probably be quite limited. They will usually want to treat you all the same, so you won't be able to do anything the AAs can't do. That can shape the direction of your entire career, and limit your potential.

Interesting...

What can CRNAs do that AAs can't do?

loveanesthesia

Specializes in CRNA.

What can CRNAs do that AAs can't do?

CRNAs can work independtly in all 50 states, while AAs must be supervised by an anesthesiologist, and are not recognized in the majority of states. CRNAs work in a lot of rural areas where there are no anesthesiologists, and I work in a large group, for anesthesiologists, but am not supervised. The CRNAs are employees, but we do our cases independtly, which is much more efficient. We cover 2 hospitals, and three surgi-centers and would need more people if the CRNAs were supervised. Being in a supervised setting doesn't mean you don't think on your own, but some people in some practices become 'helpers', and don't make decisions, but do what the MDA tells them to do. It can be difficult to transition out of that mind set, but you don't have to be that way and many are not. Do the MDs push your drugs for you? Do you have to call them to give a vasopressor? to administer blood? Check out these things, and if the answer is yes, then you'll have to fight from becoming a 'helper' rather than an indepent CRNA.

CRNAs can insert invasive lines and perform regional anesthesia, AAs cannot. Regional anesthesia skills are important for OB, surgi-centers, and rural hospitals. You are more marketable with regional skills.

Obviously the group you are looking at is a supervised situation since they are going to hire AAs, so at that group, being a CRNA won't make a difference. But if you were to leave there, it can.

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