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work abroad w/out experience.. possible?

Philippines   (25,404 Views 88 Comments)
by bajoy bajoy (New Member) New Member

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you are just trying to encourage other nurses skip valuable training and endanger a patient's life if you do that. i think it's bad just to give other filipino nurses the illusion that a tourist visa will guarantee them a job in america. they discriminate people as well and they will trample you down if you are a newbie. better be safe than sorry. especially if you don't know much about lawsuits in america.

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sofia_815 specializes in Medical Surgical-current.

32 Posts; 1,053 Profile Views

Try to have experience first for your own sake..You'll have a much harder time trying to cope up with trainings especially in the USA..

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mtreyes specializes in ER (future assignment).

203 Posts; 2,305 Profile Views

it is not necessary to have trainings back home...

when i was interviewed for my employment last Sept 4, the intervieweer asked me:

"what is the biggest obstacle you think you will face as you practivenursing here?"...

My answer was:

"i think its the lackof experience in this profession.."

the interviewer replied: "that is your asset. because it is better to train people that to untrain them."

i am just sharing my experience, and i know this is not the general glimpse of what reality is......

but then again, with the on going retrogression, there is no point missing opportunity to train back home.

Goodluck to everyone....

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k3immigrant specializes in critical care.

56 Posts; 1,153 Profile Views

you are just trying to encourage other nurses skip valuable training and endanger a patient's life if you do that. i think it's bad just to give other filipino nurses the illusion that a tourist visa will guarantee them a job in america. they discriminate people as well and they will trample you down if you are a newbie. better be safe than sorry. especially if you don't know much about lawsuits in america.

re this thread, we are NOT at all encouraging not to have experience when you come to work here in the US. we all know how a lot of nursing graduates didn't have any acute hospital experience before because it was hard to find one as there were more nurses than jobs and also these new grads that are trying their luck here.what we are trying to point here is:it is NOT a disadvantage not to have an acute hospital experience at all - and i am basing it through my own experience.when i started working here, all i had was the knowledge i gained in nursing school.

yes, discrimination exists anywhere, even in our own countries(i got discriminated when i went to nursing school in the city as i was from the province) but if you stand your ground, you're good to go.

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pinoy_guy specializes in Med/Surg/Med-Tele/SDU/ED.

490 Posts; 8,184 Profile Views

it is not necessary to have trainings back home...

. . .

the interviewer replied: "that is your asset. because it is better to train people that to untrain them."

what we are trying to point here is:it is NOT a disadvantage not to have an acute hospital experience at all - and i am basing it through my own experience.

this was also the feedback I got from RN friends who are now working in the US.

from what I know, agencies in the Philippines are the ones insisting on Philippine nursing experience.

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122 Posts; 5,095 Profile Views

this was also the feedback I got from RN friends who are now working in the US.

from what I know, agencies in the Philippines are the ones insisting on Philippine nursing experience.

Yup, it's only the agency requiring these...to protect their names perhaps.

From a personal experience during my interview w/ a U.S. employer...the chief nurse said that its ok for them to hire fresh grads even w/o hosp. experience because they themselves have lots of fresh grads who were fast-learners.

Anyway, since there's a retrogression, it would be a better move to gain some hosp. experience for continued learning. And just because hosp. experience is not required in the U.S., doesnt mean you would altogether neglect your career growth when you're still in your home country. Dont work in a job that pays (e.g. call center)>> still opt for nursing-related though you get minimum wage...argh!.

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279 Posts; 2,413 Profile Views

That's how it is done here. That's the system. If it's correct or not is open for debate.

However, once a nurse becomes a regular staff every routine procedure should be done 1st by the staff and they get only 1 try then suppose to pass the "buck" to the next in line w/c are the interns then in turn to the residents.

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both ways, none of that should be acceptable (i.e. the doctor relying on the nurse's assessment or the nurse depending on the clerk/intern). nursing and medicine are considered distinct professions answerable to different practice standards. nurses aren't doctors' handmaids hence it is only right that they assess their patients separately as well as make their own nursing diagnoses to carry out. doctors write medical diagnoses and whatever treatment/management they order will be collarborative with nursing or other professional interventions.

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2,860 Posts; 9,302 Profile Views

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both ways, none of that should be acceptable (i.e. the doctor relying on the nurse's assessment or the nurse depending on the clerk/intern). nursing and medicine are considered distinct professions answerable to different practice standards. nurses aren't doctors' handmaids hence it is only right that they assess their patients separately as well as make their own nursing diagnoses to carry out. doctors write medical diagnoses and whatever treatment/management they order will be collarborative with nursing or other professional interventions.

Yes, you are correct. Unfortunately, that is how it is done in most hospitals here, esp. w/ those that have both medical clerks and interns.

But just want to make some clarifications (to be fair) that consultant doctors never rely on the nurse's assessments but they rely on their residents and the residents sometimes rely on their interns and/or clerks.

If you would notice.. the medical clerks and/or interns do the V/S, follow-up the labs, maintains the NGTs and other cathethers and tubes, does the daily wound-care, administers medications (except for the routine ones), etc..

I'm sure you observed these here.

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279 Posts; 2,413 Profile Views

Yes, you are correct. Unfortunately, that is how it is done in most hospitals here, esp. w/ those that have both medical clerks and interns.

But just want to make some clarifications (to be fair) that consultant doctors never rely on the nurse's assessments but they rely on their residents and the residents sometimes rely on their interns and/or clerks.

If you would notice.. the medical clerks and/or interns do the V/S, follow-up the labs, maintains the NGTs and other cathethers and tubes, does the daily wound-care, administers medications (except for the routine ones), etc..

I'm sure you observed these here.

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first, i miss the doggie avatar, hehe.

yeah, i'm simply saying how things should be (as we've been taught it should be). i never really had the chance to see how it is home but from what i remember my sister tells me, way back when she was an md student, they would often ask the nurses about how-to's (foleys, IV, etc...) as they USUALLY know better hands-on than some doctors who must have stopped touching pts after medical school, hehe. (NO generalization here and no offense directed to anyone....)

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2,860 Posts; 9,302 Profile Views

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first, i miss the doggie avatar, hehe.

yeah, i'm simply saying how things should be (as we've been taught it should be). i never really had the chance to see how it is home but from what i remember my sister tells me, way back when she was an md student, they would often ask the nurses about how-to's (foleys, IV, etc...) as they USUALLY know better hands-on than some doctors who must have stopped touching pts after medical school, hehe. (NO generalization here and no offense directed to anyone....)

Yes, you are correct. Non-surgical consultant doctors pretty much stop doing procedures after their residency training.

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4 Posts; 686 Profile Views

I think its best to get experience first. people just see nursing in the philippines as a means to go to the US and make money (i know im making a sterotype but for those who arent like that im sorry) now dont get me wrong im in support of that i just dont think being in a rush to get money should interfer with gaining a little experience

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122 Posts; 5,095 Profile Views

philippine nsg experience is not credited in the u.s....and so ar the over-priced trainings/seminars like acls blah blah>> these are all money-making crap!

an aunt of mine whos been working as a nurse in the us for god-knows-how-long told me so. before immigrating to the us, she has worked in the philippines, as well as libya(middle east) at the height of the bloody war! >> and that suicide work wasnt counted in the us either! what more if the work was from a corrupt country like the philippines. no wonder japan is thinking of dumping all their garbage in the trash can a.k.a. philippines.

as for experience, if i dont have any other choice, why volunteer? apply as staff nurse instead, she said. after all, we are professionals now (or maybe professional slaves?) where can you ever find a professional who has to volunteer and "that even doesnt give an assurance that you will be hired". all you get is some certificate! arent ojt's, like in some professions, have decent starting pays? so why not in nursing? what difference do we have with other professionals? and think about having to volunteer at a govt hospital at no fixed duration before being absorbed. i know someone who volunteered for nine months before being absorbed. raaatssss...we are not slaves for crissake...like beggars who beg for hospitals(who take advantage of our ignorance) to hire us:angryfire

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