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Women's and Children Telephone Triage

Posted

Specializes in FNP-BC / ICU. Has 7 years experience.

I am currently a general medicine ICU nurse at a small community hospital, previously cardiothoracic stepdown at a large University hospital. I have approximately 6 years of nursing under my belt. I have finished one semester of grad school. I have been offered a part time position doing telephone triage at a Children's Hospital specializing in Women and Children. My program is FNP focused and will end with a DNP. My future employer was excited I was in school, said I would be able to shadow providers and they would love to help me work on my capstone project. In the meantime the work will be M, T and W 8 am to 5 pm because I have school Thurs and Friday. I only have to put in 20 hours, but can put in 24 if I want to work a full 3 days. I am kind of burnt at the bedside and I am excited to learn a new clinical perspective in specialties relevant to my FNP. My interests are in hospice and palliative as well, to include pediatric (not to freak anyone out, I have just experienced a lot of loss in my life and understand that there is always a need to help with that). I don't expect a lot of phone calls in that arena though.

What I am looking for is anyone willing to share the challenges of the transition. What are your major frustrations? What does a really great day look like for you? I researched a lot about the position before accepting, but I have 5 weeks now before I start orientation and want to really be mentally prepared with reasonable expectations. 😉

KrysyRN, BSN

Has 30 years experience.

Biggest frustration:

Keeping the calls within the allotted time frame. Some callers want to give you their life story, and it is usually not necessary to have that much info to make a recommendation.

A really great day is when all calls are within the allotted time frame and all callers state that they understand and will follow the recommendations that you provide to them. Also, it's really nice to receive positive feedback from callers or even your supervisor when you've handled a call(s) particularly well.

Be prepared to learn how to navigate many different systems and resources and to possibly use them all during a single call.

Best of luck with your new job!

ZenLover, MSN, RN, NP

Specializes in FNP-BC / ICU. Has 7 years experience.

Thank you for sharing! It is very much appreciated.