What kind of college/school do i need to attend to become a nurse?

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Is there a certain nurse school/college i need to attend to become a nurse?

Or can i just take nurse classes at a community college to become a nurse?

Basically my question is, whats the school process to become a nurse?

Where should i go first and end up?

Any advice would be helpful, thanks :)

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

102 Articles; 27,612 Posts

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

There are several different point of entrance for becoming a nurse.

1) The ADN (associate degree in nursing): 70 percent of all RNs in the U.S. received their nursing degrees from community college programs.

2) The BSN (bachelor of science in nursing): this is another common pathway to becoming an RN.

3) The diploma in nursing: this pathway takes 3 years to complete before becoming an RN, and the numbers of diploma programs are in steep decline.

4) The MSN (master of science in nursing): if you have a degree in an unrelated field, you might be eligible for admission into a direct-entry MSN program.

All people who successfully complete one of the 4 educational options listed above are eligible to take their state boards to attain licensure as an RN.

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

102 Articles; 27,612 Posts

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

There's also the LPN option (licensed practical nurse). Most state nurse practice acts define the LPN as a practitioner of basic nursing, and the RN as a practitioner of professional nursing. The LPN is known as the LVN (licensed vocational nurse) in the states of California and Texas.

1. Community college LPN programs usually take 18 months to 2 years, and commonly result in a diploma. Some programs offer an associate degree in practical nursing.

2. Trade school LPN programs usually take 12 months full-time and result in a diploma or certificate upon completion.

3. Technical schools and adult education programs also commonly offer LPN programs, which are usually 12 months long.

4. In certain Midwestern states, the LPN program is offered at state universities and results in an associate degree upon graduation.

All people who successfully complete one of the 4 educational options listed above are eligible to take their state boards to attain licensure as an LPN/LVN.

I go to a community college. I looked into the local school of nursing and it was basically the same program but about $12,000 more. So basically you're paying for the name. I think if nothing is wrong with the community college, then go that route since it's cheaper. Good luck!

Seyma

82 Posts

If you just want to get an associates degree in nursing then community college is the way to go.

If you want to get your bachelors you're going to have to get that at a private nursing school or a university (4 year college). With a BSN you have more responsibility and usually more pay but of course your pay will vary depending on the city where you work.

Not including your General Education Requirements, an Associates degree usually takes 2 years and a bachelors take 3 years though some schools offer an accelerated bachelors that can be completed in 2 years however with that you'd have to take courses year around.

You can also start off with an associated degree and later down the road get your bachelors. Usually an ADN to BSN takes 2 years unless an accelerated program is offered.

So heres the break down: ADN = 2 years BSN=3 years ADN to BSN = additional 2 years so if you skip the ADN and go straight for your BSN, it may cost more, but you'll save yourself a year.

I don't know your living situation right now if your single or married, working full time, or with kids but there's so many options in nursing that you'll find something that can accommodate you.

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