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What duties are available to NPs/CNLs?

Posted

So I was looking at this site: http://www.discovernursing.com/explore-specialties#no-filters

It lists some career options for nurses, and some things like forensics or travel nurses sound appealing, but I heard that NPs do more administrative work than RNs do. I also know about how they can have private practice and prescribe medications too. I'm planning on applying to an entry level master's program because I already have a bachelor's degree in another field, and I am hoping I would be able to do more interactive stuff. The reason why I want to apply to a master's program is because I don't just want to apply for another bachelor's degree and stop there because I already have a B.S. ... :/

Is it true that RNs are more flexible and can switch specialties easily, whereas NPs have to take more education or something to specialize?

I'm not... really sure what to do x_x

You should post this in the NP forum under the APRN link in the yellow band. They would probably explain their role more appropriately than those in the pre nursing forum.

Retired APRN, MSN, RN, APRN

Specializes in Psychiatry, Mental Health. Has 35 years experience.

NPs are nurse practitioners, nurses first of all. You have to be a nurse with a BSN before you can enter an NP program. There are accelerated BSN programs for people who already hold another degree that you may qualify for, but you will still have to take all the nursing classes and put in your clinical hours as a student nurse. You will probably also have to make up some prerequisites, depending on what your degree is in.

It's important to remember that a APRN is an RN it's the advanced portion of their practice that is specialized. Not sure exactly what you mean that a nurse is more flexible and can switch specialties easily -- if you are working a medsurg floor and want to transfer to the ICU or a peds units or the ED, yes you can do that and gain a more specialized experience.

As an APRN if your practice is as a GeriPsych NP then you can't suddenly start working in a Pediatric facility a family NP can't suddenly decided they would rather work in surgery as a CRNA... but I know in the area of the country where I live, any APRN can still work as a RN in any area that is outside their advanced scope however most that I know would rather not because they find it difficult to practice without being able to function in the advanced role (ie, have to start waiting for orders for a med or procedure instead of being able to prescribe them directly)

I would post this in the other forums, but I'm afraid it may be considered spamming if I post a topic more than once

I already took most of the pre-reqs, such as Anatomy/Physiology, Microbio, Lifespan Psych, Nutrition, Stats, etc so I am planning on applying to some entry level programs.

Do people typically have to choose a specialty before they apply to school, or can do they do that while in school/after graduation? If the latter is a choice, does that mean I would have to go through additional education or training to become specialized?

Retired APRN, MSN, RN, APRN

Specializes in Psychiatry, Mental Health. Has 35 years experience.

[...]

Do people typically have to choose a specialty before they apply to school, or can do they do that while in school/after graduation? If the latter is a choice, does that mean I would have to go through additional education or training to become specialized?

Not sure what you mean.

You have to become an RN-BSN first. You do not specialize during that phase. When you go on to apply to NP school, you have to know the specialty in order to apply to the right program. I am a psychiatric/mental health nurse practitioner. I cannot work as an anesthetist or nurse-midwife, for example.