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UK to US: How should I approach pursuing work and a masters in the US?

Hello!

I'm a student in the UK pursuing a BSN. I've traveled to and been to college in the US (for a different degree) and fell in love with the country. I read that the immigration process takes 2 years and a minimum of 2 years of work experience is required. Would that mean that I would have to work for 2 years then start the process or am I able to start the process during that 2 year period? When do you think is an appropriate time to apply to an agency?

I'm also planning to go on and pursue a masters at a University in the States. However I cannot afford it on my own currently so I'm thinking of working at a University that offers my program with a Hospital that I can work at while saving up to do a masters there. I know it sounds strange and I'm not sure if it's possible, but has been through it or have advice? I'm not sure what kind of approach I should take.

Thank you in advance!

Silverdragon102, BSN

Specializes in Medical and general practice now LTC.

For the US you don’t need work experience but more beneficial if you do for the employer. Nursing isn’t in demand like it was years ago and for many UK nurses there are issues meeting requirements 

What are the some of the requirements that nurses have issues meeting, if you don't mind me asking?

meanmaryjean, DNP, RN

Specializes in NICU, ICU, PICU, Academia.

1 hour ago, studyinginpandemic said:

What are the some of the requirements that nurses have issues meeting, if you don't mind me asking?

US nurses are trained as generalists- and nurses from other countries who lack concurrent coursework and clinical experiences in adults, peds and mental health do not qualify for licensure. They CAN qualify by making up the deficiencies- but those offerings are scarce and expensive. 

Silverdragon102, BSN

Specializes in Medical and general practice now LTC.

3 hours ago, meanmaryjean said:

US nurses are trained as generalists- and nurses from other countries who lack concurrent coursework and clinical experiences in adults, peds and mental health do not qualify for licensure. They CAN qualify by making up the deficiencies- but those offerings are scarce and expensive. 

Also Obstetrics is an issue

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