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Triple Lumen Ports

Nurses   (156,707 Views | 21 Replies)
by Dawson Dawson (New) New

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RNPATL is a MSN, RN and specializes in Nursing Education and Critical Care..

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Quote
Originally posted by Zee_RN

I was always taught distal for blood draws, medial for TPN and proximal for IV infusions. But I don't think that is a "hard and fast" nursing rule; the safest answer would be "CHECK COMPANY POLICY." I have seen all three ports used for all three stated uses. If you do have CVP readings, you must have your transducer connected to the distal port.

I have to agree with your post .... checking the facility's policy is certainly the way to go. I know that my facility policy is slightly different than some of the posts here. Good call.

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6 Posts; 1,106 Profile Views

Thank you so much for all of your replies. I really appreciate the advice. I'm sure I'll be back as more questions arise!

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86 Posts; 1,696 Profile Views

Helps a lot to read from the experienced nurses! We are covering this in class now, and will be tested on it Tuesday. It sticks a lot better when I hear fellow nurses discussing real life situations. :nurse:

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Also, the way it is in RL isn't always the same as in the books, as you've no doubt realized from reading our replies! The important thing to ask is "okay, this is different from what I was taught. Is it still safe for the patient?"

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48 Posts; 1,755 Profile Views

Thanks Mark,

I have been an RN for 15 years (ER now) . I rarely use central lines now and that was a good refresher course for me. The most we do in the ER is put the line in and send them off to the unit!!

Luanne

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canoehead has 30 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ER.

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Yet another point of view- I have been told to alternate the ports you hang the antibiotics from so that each lumen gets a dose, and there is no space for the bugs to crawl into and hide.

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neneRN has 8 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Emergency, Trauma.

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In nursing school, we were taught to remember by:

Proximal=Phlebotomy

Medial=Medicines

Distal=Diet (TPN)

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86 Posts; 1,696 Profile Views

that's easy to remember! will have to pass it along

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Zee_RN has 17 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Hospice, Critical Care.

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A coworker last night was telling me that at her last hospital, they never, ever used the distal port for anything but TPN. Even if the patient was NEVER going to get TPN, they did not use the distal port. EVER. If they needed more than the proximal and medial ports, they'd put in another line!! An additional triple lumen would be inserted rather than using the distal port on the existing triple lumen. Now that strikes me as a bit extreme.

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4 Posts; 747 Profile Views

In most cases the brown port is the largest and is the distal port. It is also the port where the wire comes out when you insert the tlc... It is prudent to reserve this line for blood draws, volume infusions and transfusions... Save the smaller ports for your tpn and micro or macro drips... Remember to not break your tpn lines once you've dedicated your medial or proximal port to it... This is a major risk for infection...

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