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Should I go straight into a BSN program?

ADN/BSN   (389 Views | 4 Replies)
by lxx lxx (New) New Student

36 Profile Views; 2 Posts

Hello,

I recently graduated from an ADN program and I am currently preparing for the NCLEX-- however, I am a bit unsure on whether or not I should be applying to jobs or if I should be applying to a BSN program. I don't think I would be able to start a job and go to school at the same time but I'm not sure which one I should focus on first. My initial plan was to enroll in a RN-BSN program after NCLEX and then getting a job afterward, but all of my peers already have jobs lined up after they get their license and I am doubting myself now. Sorry if this was a stupid question but I would really appreciate any advice. Thank you! 

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BSNbeDONE has 34 years experience as a ASN, BSN, LPN, RN and specializes in Med/Surg, LTACH, LTC, Home Health.

2,455 Posts; 25,077 Profile Views

Once you become an RN and begin working, why not let your employer pay for the BSN? So, NCLEX first, job second, BSN third. Without the first, the second and third is a moot point, don't you agree?

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by lxx New Student

2 Posts; 36 Profile Views

21 hours ago, BSNbeDONE said:

Once you become an RN and begin working, why not let your employer pay for the BSN? So, NCLEX first, job second, BSN third. Without the first, the second and third is a moot point, don't you agree?

I see your point. Thanks so much for your reply! :) 

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On 5/26/2020 at 9:25 PM, BSNbeDONE said:

NCLEX first, job second, BSN third. 

I agree that this should be the order of your priorities but in reality, none of these steps are exclusive of the others. You can easily study for the NCLEX while still applying for jobs and exploring BSN programs. I think your first priority should be passing the NCLEX but you would be doing yourself a disservice if you weren't also apply for jobs at the same time.

Similarly, I wouldn't recommend delaying pursing the BSN for too long. Most RN-BSN programs are specifically designed to be accessible to working nurses and are VERY doable while working. Being enrolled in a BSN program can also be  a plus for employers in your job search. It shows you are serious about advancing yourself as a professional. In competitive job markets it can be something to help differentiate yourself. (In some geographic areas, ADN nurses will only be hired on the condition that they complete a BSN within a certain timeframe). Depending on where you are located (or plan on looking) jobs might not be that easy to come but now. I think it would be wise to spend a little bit of time at least exploring BSN programs if not applying.

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How 2 Become a Nurse is a BSN, RN and specializes in ICU, Coaching, Counseling.

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On 5/26/2020 at 1:53 PM, lxx said:

Hello,

I recently graduated from an ADN program and I am currently preparing for the NCLEX-- however, I am a bit unsure on whether or not I should be applying to jobs or if I should be applying to a BSN program. I don't think I would be able to start a job and go to school at the same time but I'm not sure which one I should focus on first. My initial plan was to enroll in a RN-BSN program after NCLEX and then getting a job afterward, but all of my peers already have jobs lined up after they get their license and I am doubting myself now. Sorry if this was a stupid question but I would really appreciate any advice. Thank you! 

@lxx

Definitely start working first! Most hospital new grad programs pay the same regardless of ADN, BSN, or MSN! A lot of hospitals will also pay your tuition to make the transition from ADN to BSN. I would start working as an ADN and get paid to complete the BSN. After a few months you'll get into a rhythm and school will be totally manageable. If it gets busy later your employer may also be willing to let you do part time or per diem for a while. Save money and time by working while getting your BSN!

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