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Should I continue to study my RN?

Posted
mishxxix mishxxix (New) New

Hi all,

I am currently an EEN (including IV) and am having a hard time deciding whether or not I should study to be an RN. I was accepted into uni and due to start in June however whilst there are times I'm eager to be an RN, there are also times I'm content with just being EN.

What really encouraged me to do my RN were the job opportunities. I have been an EN for 4 years, those of which were in an aged care facility. Most of the EN job opportunities I saw were mainly in a nursing home, and those in hospital required experience I didn't have.

Just over a month ago I was lucky enough to get a part time job in a sub-acute ward. I am really loving my new job atm but I'm not sure if I'm just in a 'comfortable' phase.

My main questions are:

- Is it possible to continue working part-time as an EN whilst studying RN?

- Are there any EN's who've studied RN, that can tell me if there's much difference or if it was worth it?

- To the nurses working in hospital: do you have EN's on your ward, or mainly RN's? (I understand EN's cannot work in critical care, unless that's changed.)

- Would it be worth considering to study part-time? if there's anyone who has done part time, what was the work load like?

Thanks in advance :) (and apologies for the long post and if this has been asked before, first post :p)

EDNURSE20, BSN

Specializes in ED, med-surg, peri op. Has 3 years experience.

Go for it! If you want to work in the hospital you will need to be a RN. at my local hospital EN are on in the elderly inpt mental health ward and At&R. But most of them have been working for 20-30 years. They won't be hiring more EN when they leave, they will be replace with RN.

During first year of your degree you will have no issue working part time, honestly you will find it pretty easy. During second year it might get a bit harder, but Most students work while studying. You experience will make Uni much easier. And if your already hired at hospital you will find it much easier to get an RN job.

And yes! There is a big difference between EN and RN. bigger scope of practise and more responsibilities.

You've already applied and about to start Uni, this is something you want. Give it a try before you really doubt weather or not it's worth. Just remember first year will be a cakewalk, you will know it all. But when second year hits you will notice the difference.

Go for it! If you want to work in the hospital you will need to be a RN. at my local hospital EN are on in the elderly inpt mental health ward and At&R. But most of them have been working for 20-30 years. They won't be hiring more EN when they leave, they will be replace with RN.

During first year of your degree you will have no issue working part time, honestly you will find it pretty easy. During second year it might get a bit harder, but Most students work while studying. You experience will make Uni much easier. And if your already hired at hospital you will find it much easier to get an RN job.

And yes! There is a big difference between EN and RN. bigger scope of practise and more responsibilities.

You've already applied and about to start Uni, this is something you want. Give it a try before you really doubt weather or not it's worth. Just remember first year will be a cakewalk, you will know it all. But when second year hits you will notice the difference.

thanks so much for the input! :)

Yeah it's so strange, when I was studying my EN the teachers made it out that they're replacing a lot of RN's with EN's but I found it to be quite the opposite, very limited. Doing my RN seems to make more sense as I don't want to reach a dead end with career opportunities.

Quick question if you don't mind.. Once I finish my RN I plan to do a grad year. If I don't get accepted into a grad year what are my chances of landing a job? I keep hearing that we have to do a grad year in order to get a job and it's unclear whether this is true or not. Is EN experience considered for an RN job?

Thanks

EDNURSE20, BSN

Specializes in ED, med-surg, peri op. Has 3 years experience.

I don't think you need to do a grad year to get hired. Getting a job is all about the people you know, so if your in the hospital make a good impression. And an even better one when your completing placements. If they like you, they will remember you and hire you.

But EN experience is definitely an advantage. Just don't tell people your one when you on placements, especially the first placement of two, they will take advantage of you and use you like a staff memeber instead of teaching you like a student.

EDNURSE20, BSN

Specializes in ED, med-surg, peri op. Has 3 years experience.

Also just be weary of what unis say, they want student there to make money. That's why they said ENs have better job opportunities, which may happen for very very very few in selected areas, but they are mostly in aged care now. I would try find a job after you get your RN, then you employer will likely fund your postgrad study.

There is work for EN's on a mix of wards, however, RN does give you more opportunities (plus the pay is better).

you can definitely keep working whilst doing your conversion - it will vary between uni's, but at my uni you an do almost all of the units online, so you only have to be on campus for 2hrs a week + obviously there is the time that you need to take off to do prac.

I'm undergrad RN - from my limited hospital experience so far -

Public hospital ward: had 1 EN everyone else was an RN

Private orthopaedic ward: about 50% EN's

Private postnatal ward: mix of EN's, Rn's and Midwives