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serving alcohol to patients

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by mqurse37 mqurse37 (New) New

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47 Posts; 1,721 Profile Views

The hospital pharmacy that I volunteer as a tech at keeps all kinds of liquor to send to the patients if a doc orders it.

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merlee has 36 years experience.

1,246 Posts; 13,672 Profile Views

Many, many years ago I worked in 'mixed-use' facility and we had a pt who had "leave" priveleges. He could leave unaccompanied to go wherever he wanted. It was usually to a local bar. He would call a cab, wheel himself to the front door, the cabbie (a particular cabbie) would transfer him into the cab, stow the wheelchair, and take him away. A few hours later, he would return, totally drunk. He was an ugly drunk, in every sense of the word. He happened to be a V.A. patient, and we would call the social worker the next day to complain about his abusive behaviour.

She had a hard time believing us because he was so sweet during the day when she would call or visit. Eventually, he was transferred to another facility.

But we had others who would get a glass of wine or beer in the evenings, and I think it was helpful to some.

Many ALFs have happy hour around here, and please do not cut in line!!!!

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kenyacka specializes in n/a.

91 Posts; 3,489 Profile Views

In Missouri, the residents have basically the same rights as you and I. We cannot keep them from smoking or drinking, but we can keep it locked up so that they aren't smoking in their rooms which is unsafe. I know it's hard, but no one busts into your home and tells you "hey stupid, don't drink that with all those meds!" you know? They're called residents for a reason... it's their home, not a hospital.

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Lynx25 has 1 years experience as a LPN and specializes in LTC.

331 Posts; 6,586 Profile Views

We have "Happy Hour" every week on Friday with beer and wine, A refridgerator with Budweiser in it for a certain resident, and another is allowed two shots of Jack Daniels a day.

I don't care if it's not medically needed... they want to drink, let them have a few glasses of wine.. let the family take them out for cocktails, have fun!

As far as the med pass thing... If I work nights, I have 60 patients. Don't wanna hear the FIRST whimper about med pass times. Seriously.

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Not_A_Hat_Person has 10 years experience as a RN and specializes in Geriatrics, Home Health.

1 Follower; 2,900 Posts; 38,088 Profile Views

When I worked in assisted living, we had residents who had orders for booze. One had a scheduled drink and a PRN drink.

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4,266 Posts; 22,573 Profile Views

One of the standard orders on admission to all LTCs I've worked in was the ok to have alcohol. The nursing home is their home. It's not prison, or some sort of punishment. These folks were drinking booze at home with their meds. To NOT give it could be a bigger risk, depending on how long the guy has been drinking. Granted 3 shots isn't much in terms of alcoholism- and the guy may not have an addiction; but physical tolerance is not the same thing. If you'd rather deal with the death of someone following seizures w/DTs- I guess that's up to you (along with withholding a MD order). It's booze- not cyanide. :)

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MomRN0913 specializes in ICU.

1,131 Posts; 19,668 Profile Views

If the LTC is their home, they are entitled ot it, and a Dr's order needs to be in place.

As far as the meds go, think about it. How many people who live at home take their meds at 6pm, then 8pm, then 10pm?

A patient being managed at home usually has morning meds and night meds. That's it. And usually when it is convenient for them. It's different in an acute care setting, if there is scheduled abx, or you are strictly trying to control a BP.

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