school decision help: Emory MN pre-licensure vs RUSH GEM

Posted
by waterair waterair (New) New Student Pre-Student

Currently, I’m deciding which would be the best fit for me…

Ultimately want to get my Ph.D., in the end, to conduct research in mental health disorders for POC and minority children (I love kids!).

As for now, I want to get my RN to work for 1-2 years to get experience with pediatric populations and learn more about the nursing field so I can properly assist the population I’m studying. I attended UW Madison (I am from Wisco) with a BS in HDFS and I’ve done research for 4 years. Currently, I work for a lab as a research technician studying COVID in AA communities.

I love the idea of living in a big city and working with the city population! However, I also love how Emory offers an in-person Ph.D. and receives greater funding from the NIH. Honestly, Emory is pricey but I wouldn’t have to worry about my doctorate in the future as both RUSH AND EMORY offer fully-funded tuition and stipend… I am also a black woman if that also helps with anything haha. (If y’all know about scholarships please let me know!)

Overall both schools are wonderful options! It’s just the idea of packing up and moving further or just 2hrs away, financial aid, and is it worth it to go to a pricer school for the name???

Nimrodel

Nimrodel, BSN, RN

Specializes in Psychiatric/Mental Health, Med-Surg, Corrections. Has 4 years experience. 80 Posts

I'd like to clarify: is this decision for BOTH your MSN and phD automatically, or is just the MSN, and you're reflecting on future options?
My two cents: nursing doesn't care as much about name schools as much as most other fields. *especially* for licensure programs. Some schools carry a bit of a stigma to them (largely the disreputable for-profit ones...) but it will not affect your future job prospects. Your phd, name recognition is maybe more important - and in that case, you should evaluate which school has an advisor that more closely matches your goals. I would also add that the CDC headquarters are in Atlanta, if that's an interest for you at all. But when in doubt, my advice is almost always go with the option that involves less money.

Out of curiosity, can I ask why you want to become a nurse if your ultimate goal is research in a field that is also represented by other degrees? Sociology and public health come immediately to mind, but also anthropology or  human development. You would likely have an easier time finding research advisors in those fields, and from what you've described, nursing seems like a cumbersome route to that path, particularly when you already have a bachelors in a different field. In particular, nursing is a *clinically focused, medical field*. If you work in mental health as a nurse, there will likely be a big focus on medications and crisis management. If you work in mainstream pediatrics, the focus will be not on mental health. I'm sure there's more to your rationale than your above post, the trajectory just doesn't seem to make the most sense. Please don't mistake that as me saying your ultimate career goal isn't a good one - the research you describe is incredibly important - but I don't understand why nursing is your in-between step.

I just find myself questioning why you want to become a nurse when from what you've described it doesn't actually sound like you... want to be a nurse.
 

waterair

waterair

9 Posts

1 hour ago, Nimrodel said:

I'd like to clarify: is this decision for BOTH your MSN and phD automatically, or is just the MSN, and you're reflecting on future options?
My two cents: nursing doesn't care as much about name schools as much as most other fields. *especially* for licensure programs. Some schools carry a bit of a stigma to them (largely the disreputable for-profit ones...) but it will not affect your future job prospects. Your phd, name recognition is maybe more important - and in that case, you should evaluate which school has an advisor that more closely matches your goals. I would also add that the CDC headquarters are in Atlanta, if that's an interest for you at all. But when in doubt, my advice is almost always go with the option that involves less money.

Out of curiosity, can I ask why you want to become a nurse if your ultimate goal is research in a field that is also represented by other degrees? Sociology and public health come immediately to mind, but also anthropology or  human development. You would likely have an easier time finding research advisors in those fields, and from what you've described, nursing seems like a cumbersome route to that path, particularly when you already have a bachelors in a different field. In particular, nursing is a *clinically focused, medical field*. If you work in mental health as a nurse, there will likely be a big focus on medications and crisis management. If you work in mainstream pediatrics, the focus will be not on mental health. I'm sure there's more to your rationale than your above post, the trajectory just doesn't seem to make the most sense. Please don't mistake that as me saying your ultimate career goal isn't a good one - the research you describe is incredibly important - but I don't understand why nursing is your in-between step.

I just find myself questioning why you want to become a nurse when from what you've described it doesn't actually sound like you... want to be a nurse.
 

Thank you for the response! I should have clarified I’ve always been interested in the medical field (I was first pre-med, pre-pa) but during my last semester I made the switch to nursing as I liked the more holistic approach towards medicine. Also I wasn’t familiar with the diversity of careers in the field (I was only exposed to bedside). 
I want to become a nurse first to care for the populations I described so I can have a more rounded scope before going straight to the PhD route and give me some more time and exposure to the field to ultimately decide if I want to go down that route. With clinical experience hopefully it will give me more insight if I want to do a more research focused degree in the long run or a DNP if I fall in love with clinical work.