Rude Cna To Nurses

Nurses Relations

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Justus

31 Posts

Having worked as a tech thru nursing school I often felt that I was talked down to by particular nurses I worked with. I had to prove myself. There is also that 'tech thing' that says make life miserable for the new people, so they don't ask for help from you. Uh huh. But working as a tech made me a better RN, although I worked with my own philosophy: "Keep the RN out of the room as much as possible".

I was speaking of the nurses etc. that feel the need to do the "tech thing" whether they're doing it to a newbie or a seasoned nurse,cna etc. It should not be acceptable at anytime to anyone.

The reason that no facility wants to lose an RN is: the hospital cannot function without RN's. The hospital can function without NA's, although it isn't pretty. It's called primary nursing.

Personally speaking I have never worked without CNAs and wouldn't want to. My point was that one is needed as much as the other. ie.( considering staff shortages could the hosp. function more or less effectively without CNAs?)

There is also a small bit of Magnet Status consideration. Nursing turnover is one of the things that the Magnet gurus look at. If there is high nursing turnover, then there is something wrong with the unit.

It's not that I don't appreciate my NA's. I do, the hardworking, no sarcasm, no attitude dependable ones are a treasure and make the unit run more efficiently. But the next time I see one of them on the phone talking about movies or what they're doing after work or on the weekend, I may just open up a can of whup-arse. It's infuriating to see this -- in fact, also my fellow RN's -- act this way when I'm lucky if I get a chance to go to the bathroom.

Not sure I understand, is that to say that you would open the can on a CNA and overlook your fellow RNs? I agree that it is "infuriating" and there is no room for it. Which brings me back, yet again, to why is this type thing so common and acceptable? Many times I have proposed that this among more offensive things should be stopped, that regardless of position we have the means to clean up healthcare/nursing...and yet nobody has agreed or disagreed.

Stitchie

587 Posts

Not sure I understand, is that to say that you would open the can on a CNA and overlook your fellow RNs? I agree that it is "infuriating" and there is no room for it. Which brings me back, yet again, to why is this type thing so common and acceptable? Many times I have proposed that this among more offensive things should be stopped, that regardless of position we have the means to clean up healthcare/nursing...and yet nobody has agreed or disagreed.

It's not just the aids, or housekeeping, or nurses or docs. We all have a part, we really are part of a team. Nowhere is this more evident in a code situation. If we practiced that level of teamwork on a regular basis, we would fix many of the problems.

I once read a poem about good nursing (can't recall where) that said something about no nurse (in any capacity) having a bad day unless all the nurses were having a bad day.

'Work ethic' is sadly missing among many in healthcare today. This is not directed at you, but rather from what I have observed from working in three different hospitals (all of them v. different).

There are those who are there to collect a paycheck and treat support staff as a means to an end and/or their personal slaves, there are those who are there to collect a paycheck but have a good work ethic, and there are those who think of nursing as a 'calling'.

Personally I like to think that I fall into the second category: I do my job, I expect to be paid fairly and I expect this behavior from others on the floor. That means, if I'm drowning (I work ED, I'm new to the ED, so I drown on nearly a daily basis) I expect, if I ask for help, someone to help me out, without snide remarks or comments. I expect them to ask, "is there anything else I can do?".

I want my co-workers, whatever their capacity, to be polite, considerate and to clean up after themselves. I want them to acknowledge a fault and fix it. I want them to come to me, f2f, and acknowlege any fault/problem/issue/omission of mine, workwise, so that I am able to fix it, instead of going behind my back to the NM or CN. I do not want to be the target or receiver of gossip and backbiting. I want to be part of the solution, not the problem.

How we go about doing that is more of a topic for a Ph.D. dissertation than a quick fix on a BB, but maybe here's a good place to start.

What we need is for each of us to go to work today tomorrow and every day with a decision to help each other out when possible, to can the 'tude, to speak kindly to and about each other. Also, to confront appropriately and kindly with the idea that you're giving an opportunity to improve rather than to cut someone down.

Call me a Pollyanna, call me naive, but what really matters is doing our jobs with the end in mind -- good patient care. I enjoy my job, I want to enjoy my co-workers, but often it's difficult. IMO if I work in this capacity, then I can set my own tone and feel good about the way that I perform my job. At the end of the shift, that's all I can really do. Know that I did the best I could, and that I helped someone or made a difference, however small, for someone else. And did so without participating in the 'eating our young' that has become so obnoxiously prevalent in healthcare today.

JMHO. :)

Yancy SPN

12 Posts

[quote I'm a cna and have been for 14 years and now and have chosen to go back to school to become a nurse finally. I'm not bagging on nurses because one day soon, I will be one, but let me tell ya, it's very hard and frustruating as well for a cna. Granted she shouldn't of had an attitude with the nurse, but I've seen alot of nurses that are the same way with the cna's. I've heard several times "that's not my job" from an RN or LPN, and I hope to God, I don't end up like that when I become a nurse. It takes teamwork between the nurses and the aides.

fssmith

31 Posts

Before I read anyone's post let me say this- I have a smart mouth. I don't take crap off of anyone. Matter of factly when I talked to the nurse advisor she told me that it was a characteristic that would get me a long way in this type of field. She explained that you wouldn't always work with the most respectful people and when I had to work with mean people I would know how to demand respect. I would tell the disgruntled winch-"If you are so smart, and know so much- why are you a cna and not a lpn or rn?" Make sure you say it in a smart a!! way.(not in front of students) That might work and if not - try this- " No matter how I do it, as long as it is correct , I still get paid and trust it's way more than you" Only use that as a last resort. Grow a thick skin and don't let anyone (boss, doctor, CNA) talk to you any kind of way.

kellilou3

59 Posts

I think what you have on your hands is what experts are now calling a "workplace bully". Maybe you should just flat out ask her why she feels the need to degrade you in front of patients. Why does she get satisfaction out of doing that, when it just makes her look like the a**hole? This website: http://www.kickbully.com has some good ideas for how to handle her if you click at the top of the page on Fight Back--Battle Techniques--Basic Responses.

Some of these helpful hints include:

-Act amused: Repeat the bully's words as a question and smile.

-Calmly ask why until you've reached her underlying motivation by using phrases such as "Why do you believe that?" or "What's your reasoning on that?"

-A failsafe respones technique is to interrupt the bully if she is in the process of a lengthy attack, excuse yourself by saying something like, "Can we talk about this later?", and return to face the bully after you have calmed down. Once you confront her after calming down, you are supposed to allow silence to settle around the her words before you speak, confront her with simple and direct questions, and keep repeating your questions until she responds clearly.

Good luck. :)

Justus

31 Posts

"Stitchie" - You say tomato and I say tomatto... LOL

Justus

31 Posts

before i read anyone's post let me say this- i have a smart mouth. i don't take crap off of anyone. matter of factly when i talked to the nurse advisor she told me that it was a characteristic that would get me a long way in this type of field. she explained that you wouldn't always work with the most respectful people and when i had to work with mean people i would know how to demand respect. i would tell the disgruntled winch-"if you are so smart, and know so much- why are you a cna and not a lpn or rn?" make sure you say it in a smart a!! way.(not in front of students) that might work and if not - try this- " no matter how i do it, as long as it is correct , i still get paid and trust it's way more than you" only use that as a last resort. grow a thick skin and don't let anyone (boss, doctor, cna) talk to you any kind of way.

:imbarhmm...was your na being sarcastic? i wonder if this cna was told the exact same thing?

imho -it is precisely that kind of caustic / unprofessional behavior that gives air to this whole thread. oh, i understand that there are times, when someone has crawled all under your skin but to allow yourself to ever sink to that level...

here again, no matter your profession, your income etc. etc. this should not ever be allowed.

Stitchie

587 Posts

"Stitchie" - You say tomato and I say tomatto... LOL

So we're in agreement then? We'll all be nice, say thanks, great job! And be an example to our coworkers!

elorra

5 Posts

So we're in agreement then? We'll all be nice, say thanks, great job! And be an example to our coworkers!

I was in a situation last year with several unqualified staff who literally hated qualified nurses (based on jealousy). One of them was best friends with the line manager who sided with her. Night duty would be horrendous because they would decide what they were to do, start obs late at the beginning of the shift and start and end of the shift despite having adequate breaks.

Stitchie

587 Posts

I was in a situation last year with several unqualified staff who literally hated qualified nurses (based on jealousy). One of them was best friends with the line manager who sided with her. Night duty would be horrendous because they would decide what they were to do, start obs late at the beginning of the shift and start and end of the shift despite having adequate breaks.

It's a horrid situation when you're left like that. I don't pretend to know what the solution is; I've just been on both sides of the 'fence', if you will.

There is no room for hatred on a nursing unit. And no sane NM would tolerate such behavior.

My previous unit, before the insane ED where I work now, was positively toxic. Rotten to the core with favoritism. I received a form letter from the CEO saying how much he valued nurses and if I ever wanted to seek employement at the hospital group again I'd be welcome with open arms, blah blah blah.

Well, I wrote back a one page email rebuttal quoting his letter and my experiences on th floor. Can't wait to see what happens. But what most likely will happen is nothing. What does he care if one more disgruntled nurse leaves? It happens every day!

Best of luck to you. I don't have any words of encouragement or any solutions. This seems to be a world-wide problem. What a shame. We have the potential to use our power for good, and instead...we tear each other up with it.

I hope all goes well for you. (((()))))

elorra

5 Posts

It's a horrid situation when you're left like that. I don't pretend to know what the solution is; I've just been on both sides of the 'fence', if you will.

There is no room for hatred on a nursing unit. And no sane NM would tolerate such behavior.

My previous unit, before the insane ED where I work now, was positively toxic. Rotten to the core with favoritism. I received a form letter from the CEO saying how much he valued nurses and if I ever wanted to seek employement at the hospital group again I'd be welcome with open arms, blah blah blah.

Well, I wrote back a one page email rebuttal quoting his letter and my experiences on th floor. Can't wait to see what happens. But what most likely will happen is nothing. What does he care if one more disgruntled nurse leaves? It happens every day!

Best of luck to you. I don't have any words of encouragement or any solutions. This seems to be a world-wide problem. What a shame. We have the potential to use our power for good, and instead...we tear each other up with it.

I hope all goes well for you. (((()))))

Thank you Stitchie for your kind words. I am no longer working in that environment although I slogged it out for 8 and a half years with no problems until I had a new line manager (promoted up). In my opinion safe teamwork depends on a good manager who values his/her staff and encourages the best out of them whatever their level of skill. Nursing is a brilliant profession and I will ever be proud that I did the training.

Stitchie

587 Posts

Thank you Stitchie for your kind words. I am no longer working in that environment although I slogged it out for 8 and a half years with no problems until I had a new line manager (promoted up). In my opinion safe teamwork depends on a good manager who values his/her staff and encourages the best out of them whatever their level of skill. Nursing is a brilliant profession and I will ever be proud that I did the training.

Glad you got out Elorra! Sometimes the most positive thing to do is to vote with your feet. I did, and although I come home exhausted I don't internalize the 'badness' of my previous unit.

A friend of mine told me that there are too many good nursing jobs out there to be miserable for one second. Keep that in mind!

Where's Leicester? My DH and I are planning a trip this summer and would love to go to England.

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