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RNs would you rather sit with the patient or pull the CNA?

Nurses   (233 Views | 2 Replies)

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So you are a brand new RN on their last day of training with your preceptor. So you have a confused all over the place patient who needs 1:1 attention and family absolutely refuses restraints chemical or physical. No one will come in and no other unit has the staff to float. There are a limited amount of CNAs on the unit. Do you pull a CNA to sit, do you pull the orientating nurse, or have the preceptor sit? What would be the pros and cons for each?

Edited by DesiDani

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Sour Lemon has 9 years experience.

3 Followers; 4,435 Posts; 33,421 Profile Views

39 minutes ago, DesiDani said:

So you are a brand new RN on their last day of training with your preceptor. So you have a confused all over the place patient who needs 1:1 attention and family absolutely refuses restraints chemical or physical. No one will come in and no other unit has the staff to float. There are a limited amount of CNAs on the unit. Do you pull a CNA to sit, do you pull the orientating nurse, or have the preceptor sit? What would be the pros and cons for each?

On the last day of training, I think the preceptor would be an ideal sitter. I'm assuming that the new nurse has progressed well and is proactive with seeking assistance with necessary.

Another good option might be for the preceptor and a CNA to alternate sitting. I would not pull the new graduate nurse off the floor on her final day of training.

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TriciaJ has 39 years experience as a RN and specializes in Psych, Corrections, Med-Surg, Ambulatory.

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I agree that the orienting nurse should not be sitting, even though it would be a welcome break.

If the preceptor is supernumerary at this point she could do the sitting. Otherwise the appropriate person is the CNA.

By the way, I've never seen chemical and soft physical restraints actually work for an elderly confused person. I consider them to be unsafe.

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