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Question about working full time and part time as a nurse?

Nurses   (8,608 Views | 19 Replies)

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47 Posts; 2,827 Profile Views

Thank you so much! Great advice!!!!

Putting all the previous posts together ...

Yes, there are jobs that will allow you to work the part time schedule you seek, but there are some significant problems with your plan.

1. You will be a new grad -- and most new grads need a full time orientation to be successful at any of the more sophisticated nursing jobs. It takes about a year before most new grads are able to be fully competent as a professional nurse.

2. Because of #1, the only type of jobs you might be able to get as a new grad seeking such minimal employment will be really "lower level" nursing jobs that won't help your career much. You would be in danger of getting stuck in such a job, losing your more sophisticated skills in time, severely limiting your nursing options for the future.

3. If you really want to give yourself a good chance for a successful nursing career, you need to invest in your career immediately after graduation. You have to take that next step of actually "giving it a go" in the best job you can find ... offering the best training and the best practical experience to help you further develop your nursing skills. If you miss that window of opportunity, your nursing options and chances of a successful nursing career will quickly diminish.

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amoLucia specializes in LTC.

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Since you're just about to start school you have some time to investigate possibilities. And you've got to get thru NS first and licensing etc. There may be things that open up as you go along. Nursing does have a lot of flexible variations but give your education a fighting chance before you encumber yourself with the what-about's and what-if's.

Thoroughly investigate your federal options as your fail-safe. Good luck.

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47 Posts; 2,827 Profile Views

GOOD ADVICE! I love this site. Everyone is so helpful and positive. Thanks for your response! Good points! GET THRU SCHOOL!!!LOL.. I am going to get with HR to see if I have any leave options that holds me a place just in case!

Since you're just about to start school you have some time to investigate possibilities. And you've got to get thru NS first and licensing etc. There may be things that open up as you go along. Nursing does have a lot of flexible variations but give your education a fighting chance before you encumber yourself with the what-about's and what-if's.

Thoroughly investigate your federal options as your fail-safe. Good luck.

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32 Posts; 2,316 Profile Views

I am in your same situation.

I am a new grad and have a great full-time job. I was hired as a Per Diem nurse at a residential school taking care of kids with Autism. They have been great about working around my schedule. I still have my full time job and am also working about 3-4 8 hour shift as an RN. I am unwilling to let my full-time job go because I don't have a full-time commitment yet. They totally understand.

If you trust in the process and yourself, it will all work out. Just finish your degree and worry about what you are going to do when you get there. Anything is possible :)

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32 Posts; 2,316 Profile Views

P.S.

with regard to llg's comments on "lower level" nursing jobs, there is no such thing. Do what your heart calls you to, which you will discover in school, and you will be very successful. People who speak this way in nursing are usually pretty mean to themselves, so it translates out onto others.

Also, eat healthy, exercise and find someway to release stress. It will make all the difference in the world in your attitude and prevent you from becoming a judgemental, disgruntled and emotionally unhealthy nurse. Best of luck :)

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llg has 43 years experience as a PhD, RN and specializes in Nursing Professional Development.

7 Followers; 13,374 Posts; 60,762 Profile Views

P.S.

with regard to llg's comments on "lower level" nursing jobs, there is no such thing. Do what your heart calls you to, which you will discover in school, and you will be very successful. People who speak this way in nursing are usually pretty mean to themselves, so it translates out onto others.

:)

I'm not mean -- to myself or anybody else. The OP was asking for the honest truth -- and the truth is that certain career choices lead to other opportunities and open doors for future types of employment. Other career choices close those doors and limit a person's later opporutnities -- or at least make it more difficult to get certain types of jobs. She needs to know (for her benefit) that the choices she makes early in her career will effect her options later.

Unless the OP is pretty darn sure that she will never want a broad range of career opportunities available for her, she should plan on using that first year or two after graduation wisely. It's sad to see so many good people limit themselves and their career options because of the choices they make at the very start of their careers. I was/am trying to prevent her from becoming one of those sad, bitter nurses who "never got the chance" for some of the highly competitive, and often, higher paying jobs in nursing because of failing to commit to their careers while in their early stages. If she gets the chance for a job that will help open future opportunities for her, I think she should take it -- and not sabatage her future options by hanging back and not committing fully to a nursing career.

But whatever the OP chooses, I certainly wish her the best of luck -- and a long and happy life.

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251 Posts; 4,873 Profile Views

Why not go for a full time job at a VA hospital and carryover your benefits, Otherwise I believe you have to decide if you really want to be a nurse or not and maybe switch your major.

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