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Pre-Reqs

Pre-Nursing   (277 Views | 4 Replies)
by nursetobe. nursetobe. (New) New Student

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Hello 🙂

I'm trying to finish my pre-requisites in one year because I have some pre-reqs done from dual credit, but my university only offers microbio in the fall and the class is already full. Additionally, it looks like the Chemistry labs will be filled by the time I get to enroll in classes. Would it look bad if I took the course at a community college when my other classes are from a university? I would prefer not to have to wait for a semester but I don't want to jeopardize my chances of getting in either.

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No, not at all. I'd say 99.5% of people applying to nursing school do their pre-reqs there. This includes people who already have a bachelor's or master's degree. There is no point in paying university prices when you can pay community college prices for the same class. Just make sure you check you're taking the right class for whichever school you're applying to and that they'll accept it.

Most nursing schools know the main pre-req classes always fill up fast. This is nothing new. You just have to take them where you can get in. The downside for you is going to be if you can even get into a community college micro class because those classes also fill up fast!

Edited by Mergirlc
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It wouldn't look bad. It is just that those classes get full quick especially in the fall. I don't think community colleges offer micro in the Summer because of how hectic the material is. How many more classes do you need to finish?

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On 4/10/2020 at 2:46 PM, Mergirlc said:

No, not at all. I'd say 99.5% of people applying to nursing school do their pre-reqs there. This includes people who already have a bachelor's or master's degree. There is no point in paying university prices when you can pay community college prices for the same class. Just make sure you check you're taking the right class for whichever school you're applying to and that they'll accept it.

Most nursing schools know the main pre-req classes always fill up fast. This is nothing new. You just have to take them where you can get in. The downside for you is going to be if you can even get into a community college micro class because those classes also fill up fast!

thank you so much!! I really appreciate the advice! 🙂

I'm trying to plan out my pre reqs and I'm just sitting here watching all of these classes fill up 😕

On 4/11/2020 at 9:51 AM, savyxval said:

It wouldn't look bad. It is just that those classes get full quick especially in the fall. I don't think community colleges offer micro in the Summer because of how hectic the material is. How many more classes do you need to finish?

thank you!! I have 10 more classes to finish, I'm a senior in high school right now.

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2 hours ago, nursetobe. said:

thank you so much!! I really appreciate the advice! 🙂

I'm trying to plan out my pre reqs and I'm just sitting here watching all of these classes fill up 😕

thank you!! I have 10 more classes to finish, I'm a senior in high school right now.

A couple bits of information since you're not in college yet:
1. Nursing schools are generally leery of dual credit and credit-by-exam. Make sure the schools you plan to apply to will accept a class taken as dual credit for a prerequisite.
2. While science classes often fill up well before the term, there's often quite a bit of movement down the wait list as overwhelmed students drop in the first week of classes. I had a lot of success just showing up to every classes until right after the last drop date to get a late-add pass when I needed to.

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