How do you study?

  1. Just wondering how everyone studies. Some people say flash cards, other say once they write something down, it just clicks for them and they can remember. Just wondering if there are any other techniques out there that some of us may not know about!
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    About tanner523

    Joined: Apr '05; Posts: 76

    6 Comments

  3. by   DivaMomto3
    Well, repetition has worked best for me. I do study guides. I take my notes, book, or whatever we've covered and using Word, I type up a fill in the blank style study guide. Sometimes I ask for definitions, lists, explanations or drawings. For example...................

    1. B-cells, when sensitized, differentiate into ______________ and _______________ cells.

    2. List some causes of inflammation.

    3. Define chemotaxis.

    4. Draw an example of what happens in antibidy-mediated immunity.



    Those are just some examples of the types of questions I ask. Then I print out 2 copies. Keep in mind, that in order to cover the material thoroughly, the study guide can be really long. I had one that was 16 pages using 12-pt Times New Roman font. Anyhow, I print 2 copies. On the first copy, I go through and answer everything using my notes. On the second one, I put my notes away and answer as much as I can on my own in blue ink. Then, what I can't answer, I get my notes and answer in red ink. I had an instructor tell me that the best way to judge how well you know your material is if you can teach it to someone. SOOO, (lol) the stuff I wrote in red ink, I write out on blank paper in a format as if I were teaching it.

    All that typing/writing makes it stick. It sounds like alot, but it really isn't anymore time consuming than making flashcards or plain 'ol rewriting your notes. Anyhow, that's my method.
  4. by   tanner523
    Thanks! I'll have to try some of those tips now! Wish me luck!
  5. by   smattles1of2
    I write out double column notes from all my notes.
  6. by   lisabeth
    Those tips are from an A student. I think we should all give this a serious try. One thing that has helped me is recording lectures. After lots and lots of begging, my other instructor said it was ok for me to tape.

    Quote from DivaMomto3
    Well, repetition has worked best for me. I do study guides. I take my notes, book, or whatever we've covered and using Word, I type up a fill in the blank style study guide. Sometimes I ask for definitions, lists, explanations or drawings. For example...................

    1. B-cells, when sensitized, differentiate into ______________ and _______________ cells.

    2. List some causes of inflammation.

    3. Define chemotaxis.

    4. Draw an example of what happens in antibidy-mediated immunity.



    Those are just some examples of the types of questions I ask. Then I print out 2 copies. Keep in mind, that in order to cover the material thoroughly, the study guide can be really long. I had one that was 16 pages using 12-pt Times New Roman font. Anyhow, I print 2 copies. On the first copy, I go through and answer everything using my notes. On the second one, I put my notes away and answer as much as I can on my own in blue ink. Then, what I can't answer, I get my notes and answer in red ink. I had an instructor tell me that the best way to judge how well you know your material is if you can teach it to someone. SOOO, (lol) the stuff I wrote in red ink, I write out on blank paper in a format as if I were teaching it.

    All that typing/writing makes it stick. It sounds like alot, but it really isn't anymore time consuming than making flashcards or plain 'ol rewriting your notes. Anyhow, that's my method.
  7. by   catzy5
    Quote from DivaMomto3
    Well, repetition has worked best for me. I do study guides. I take my notes, book, or whatever we've covered and using Word, I type up a fill in the blank style study guide. Sometimes I ask for definitions, lists, explanations or drawings. For example...................

    1. B-cells, when sensitized, differentiate into ______________ and _______________ cells.

    2. List some causes of inflammation.

    3. Define chemotaxis.

    4. Draw an example of what happens in antibidy-mediated immunity.



    Those are just some examples of the types of questions I ask. Then I print out 2 copies. Keep in mind, that in order to cover the material thoroughly, the study guide can be really long. I had one that was 16 pages using 12-pt Times New Roman font. Anyhow, I print 2 copies. On the first copy, I go through and answer everything using my notes. On the second one, I put my notes away and answer as much as I can on my own in blue ink. Then, what I can't answer, I get my notes and answer in red ink. I had an instructor tell me that the best way to judge how well you know your material is if you can teach it to someone. SOOO, (lol) the stuff I wrote in red ink, I write out on blank paper in a format as if I were teaching it.

    All that typing/writing makes it stick. It sounds like alot, but it really isn't anymore time consuming than making flashcards or plain 'ol rewriting your notes. Anyhow, that's my method.

    those are some really great tips!
    our instructor gives us an outline, and goes over it in power point the outline is just as you described with fill in the blanks. I read the chapter ahead and try to fill it out as she goes thru it. Key points I make into flash cards using the outline as fillin the blank questions.

    I totally agree if you know the material well enough to explain it to someone else then you have it solid, I try and do this as often as I can. Students often ask me questions and apologize for doing so but to me thats the best way to learn, I often find my own errors too when I help someone else its a way of all of us to work together.
  8. by   Trans-am
    I have to read things out loud then verbally repeat it to myself over and over. I have also heard that writing things out also really helps.

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