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Peri care vent

Posted

OMG I am so sick of going into work and finding out that all my incontient patients smell of urine or poop because people don't wash them when they change the briefs/sheets. Does it really take so long to grab the wipes and clean the urine off the skin?

Edited by JDZ344

fuzzywuzzy, CNA

Specializes in LTC. Has 3 years experience.

Yeah that aggravates me too. 9 out of 10 of my coworkers are mothers. I doubt they changed their babies' diapers without wipes! Then if someone really stinks they'll throw down some powder. Gross.

Our facility doesn't use wet wipes and we run out of linens a lot, so I usually just use lotion and a wad of TP. It's better than nothing.

yousoldtheworld

Has 5 years experience.

This is one of my big issues. A lot of the girls on 2nd shift (I used to work 2nds, now I'm mostly 3rds) do not use wipes on the residents unless they poop. ( A lot of them also don't wash them when they put them to bed like they're supposed to, but that's a whole other subject.)

There is absolutely no excuse for it - our facility supplies wet wipes and also no rinse peri-wash spray. I do the same thing - I spend most of my first rounds washing everyone with soap and water or peri-wash and wipes.

Would these people want urine and who knows what else left on their skin all day long?!

2ndyearstudent, CNA

Specializes in CNA.

I feel like I am talking to a brick wall. I am trying to be a good example by grabbing a bowl of water/wetwipes if somebody needs changing, but I KNOW that other people don't bother and it bugs me senseless!

It is also classified as abuse and neglect of a vulnerable adult. I reported, documented and did everything I could in that situation, but in the end I just had to find a different job. One of the first things I noticed working for my new employer was how clean everyone was.

yousoldtheworld

Has 5 years experience.

It is also classified as abuse and neglect of a vulnerable adult. I reported, documented and did everything I could in that situation, but in the end I just had to find a different job. One of the first things I noticed working for my new employer was how clean everyone was.

It is, and we've had some good workers quit for that reason. But I won't do that. I've worked at an incredibly well run facility and was unhappy there (mostly because I dislike working in geriatrics). My current facility is not very well managed and has a lot of lousy aides. However, I feel like leaving because of that would be doing a disservice not only to myself (I absolutely love working there - I love my hours and the kids I take care of are a blessing to me) but also to my residents. They may not get the care they deserve all of the time, but at least I know that for the 40 hours I'm there a week, I can make a difference.

That's what I remind myself every time leaving sounds like a good idea.

Edited by yousoldtheworld

blessedinscrubs

Specializes in Geriatric.

Urine is acidic = causes skin breakdown = bedsores. I really believe this issue is one of the reasons people get sores, not to mention rashes/skin irritation, etc. When you do peri care, you can't necessarily *see* the mess that urine leaves on the body, but it's definately there, and it eats away at the skin if it isn't cleaned.

I'm sorry, but if a CNA makes no attempt to clean the peri area after urination - that CNA just plain old does not care, and does not need to be working in healthcare.

Let's just tell it like it is!

systoly

Specializes in LTC, Memory loss, PDN. Has 23 years experience.

well, if you stop "badbathing" and start giving good baths :D...

When I worked nights, I had my crew load up a cart with washclothes soap and lotion and everybody got a good cleansing. A good night's rest is very important and patients sleep better when they are clean and comfortable.

yousoldtheworld

Has 5 years experience.

well, if you stop "badbathing" and start giving good baths :D...

When I worked nights, I had my crew load up a cart with washclothes soap and lotion and everybody got a good cleansing. A good night's rest is very important and patients sleep better when they are clean and comfortable.

What are you considering a bed bath? The bed baths I give my residents daily is washing them with soap and water, drying them, and lotioning, as well as brushing their teeth and putting carmex on them. That's what it's supposed to be - a bath, given in bed (or chair).

systoly

Specializes in LTC, Memory loss, PDN. Has 23 years experience.

Look at the grin. The OP misspelled bed bath ,"bad bath". I was being a smart a.. and made fun of it. The OP can take care of my family members any day.

yousoldtheworld

Has 5 years experience.

Ohh, haha, I missed the misspelling.

Of course, to most of my coworkers, that's a very apt description. :D

LaterAlligator

Specializes in geriatrics, dementia, ortho. Has 2 years experience.

I was very surprised when the girl training me at my new job got people up in the morning by changing them in bed without cleaning them with a cloth & water/periwash, so at first I thought maybe that was policy for some reason.

Then I realized there are specific washcloths (color coded) in every resident's bathroom and periwash for this exact purpose, so she just didn't do it for whatever reason. I don't get it either. Although the residents at my job don't usually smell either, so I think it must get done most of the time I don't have them, which is a relief.

The only time I don't is if I'm toileting a confused resident who is either too combative to let me clean them properly after urinary incontinence (BM I'll obviously have to get someone to come help me in that case) or if they pull up their clothes and bolt before I can get to them. In those cases, I'll let it slide and try them again in a little while. Otherwise, it only takes a few seconds to wet the washcloth, spray on the periwash, and give them a good once-over.

PhoenixTech, LPN

Specializes in Float. Has 3 years experience.

Aides that don't perform peri care are the same ones who'll go home and lounge around without changing their scrubs or washing their hands, face and arms off. Their children will be the ones with excessively snotty noses and filthy clothes.....you know, the ones you pray won't touch you with their soiled hands, but they always manage to do just that. Those are the aides who'll eat off of a residents tray, throw soiled linen on the floor, see poop smears on the bed rails and leave them, hide in clients' rooms, run when they observe that a co-worker needs help, keeps the rumor/gossip mill in overdrive and in most cases still live at home with 'mommy'.

Sometimes their actions stem from ignorance, arrogance, irresponsibility, lack of common sense, inflated ego, evilness, vileness as well as crudeness. Most often I find it to be laziness but sometimes it can stem from being overwhelmed.

Lately I've worked with some of the slickest aides in my facility. They are always trying to find a way not to work and it's sickening. When there's 1:1's on the floor, it's like a mad dash to the patients room and even bickering over who's going to stay to do it sometimes. My facility now has incorporated 'light duty' for the techs who've been on leave for so long. They do 1:1, pass ice, do accuchecks, run back and forth to the lab.......jeez! Talk about animosity between us! The techs not on light duty, (but want to be), resents the light duty techs, who resents the facility for bringing them back. I float now, so I'm constantly getting the short end as far as pt. assignments. The techs who work the floor regularly come up with all kind of new rules when they see me coming. I'm very quickly loosing respect for these duds and wondering how is it that they keep getting away with the crap that they do.

Whew! I guess I had some venting to do too!:o

Upgrading_Status, BSN, MSN, RN, NP

Specializes in L&D. Has 10 years experience.

I've noticed the aides at my job are as someone above stated "slick" as hell. If I wasn't in the room at the time I wouldn't have believed it. An aide came in and asked if the patient in the "A" bed was cleaned. I said I'm not sure as the patient isn't mine. For the aide to go over and check, the aide said well the patient has to be clean since the bed linen is nicely done. The aide was about to walk out when I told them to check the patient. SERIOUSLY? You needed someone to tell you to properly check your patient. The very same aides are the ones who complain that nurses don't do anything but sit at the nurses station and take long breaks. I've seen aides come in at midnight and demand a break by one. SERIOUSLY!

Someone tell me how in the h*ll these facilities continue to operate when they don't peri-care people? How do they survive State inspections? In Idaho, investigators follow the aides and nurses around with clipboards and watch every move. They ask random questions of the aides to see if they are following procedure. They look at thermostats to see if the temperature in every room is right. They look at the statistics about the incidence of falls and bed sores. Everything they observe is reported and becomes public knowledge. They always hold it over our heads how they could shut us down in a heartbeat if any one of us flubs up. Some of the horrific conditions I hear about on this forum -- I don't understand how they can even exist !!?

Pericare? What's that? Including myself probably only 3/10 CNA's on my unit seem to understand what pericare is

yousoldtheworld

Has 5 years experience.

Someone tell me how in the h*ll these facilities continue to operate when they don't peri-care people? How do they survive State inspections? In Idaho, investigators follow the aides and nurses around with clipboards and watch every move. They ask random questions of the aides to see if they are following procedure. They look at thermostats to see if the temperature in every room is right. They look at the statistics about the incidence of falls and bed sores. Everything they observe is reported and becomes public knowledge. They always hold it over our heads how they could shut us down in a heartbeat if any one of us flubs up. Some of the horrific conditions I hear about on this forum -- I don't understand how they can even exist !!?

They do that everywhere. These aides know HOW to do these things, and they do when someone is watching. But on a normal day, there's no state inspector hovering over their shoulders. Ugh. People are so freakin' lazy.

PhoenixTech, LPN

Specializes in Float. Has 3 years experience.

At my facility, they only go to certain floors. I don't know how that works but if the state were to come in and visit each floor at the same time......:eek:. The times that I've been there during a visit, I'd come out of a pt's room and the nurse will be standing there telling me to straighten up because the state is 'here'. Each and everytime I just glance at the extra activity going on and continue on with my pt's. There's no way to 'clean up' and clean pts as well.