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what path do I take? LPN and bridge, straight to RN?

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by lsthomas7 lsthomas7 (New) New

Which path do you think is best for my situation?

  1. 1. Which path do you think is best for my situation?

    • 0
      LPN then bridge
    • straight to BSN

1 member has participated

Hi! can someone help me figure out which path to take? I am 22 years old and I am just now considering nursing school. I do not have anyone providing for me which should be taken into consideration when talking about funding school and financial aid (already having loans to repay). I also get antsy when it takes long to complete something. In other words I am impatient, so I was thinking about the LPN program and then bridge to RN. My only concern is that if at any point I was interested in working in a hospital, my chances of achieving that goal will be slim to none because of this new 80: 20 ratio. Currently I work as a caregiver for an agency serving hospice clients. I like that I am able to create my own schedule, & I don't have much supervision. That is good for me because I'm very independent and don't like someone breathing over me, dictating which moves to make. I would like to continue the same type of work that I do now, home care, but broaden my scope of practice... I just need to make a better living for myself.

I should also mention that I am not sure that the agency I work for would pay more because I would then have some credentials. Ideally I would like to find a company that would pay for me to return to school. It is not ideal to have to do the LPN program, bridge to an associates, and go back AGAIN for BSN. That would be a pain, and isn't it true that at some point I would become ineligible for financial aid? Is there a such thing as LPN to BSN?

So the original question stands, which path do I take to pursue an education in nursing?

applesxoranges, BSN, RN

Specializes in ER.

Well, I would look at going straight to RN in some form. I saved money by getting my ADN and I was able to find work right away. I almost did my LPN program but it would have cost a lot more to do a LPN program. Some of them cost as much as an ADN! My former classmates also have yet to get their RN even though they have been graduated for awhile. For some people, they find adding the extra year on worth it so they can get some work experience.

I would look at six programs, preferably mix of BSN and ADN. Research requirements, passing rates for NCLEX, and cost. Limit it down to three or four and aim to get into those programs. Some have wait lists, some programs do not.

In my experience, hospitals and sometimes nursing homes will pay for people to go back to school. Agencies do not seem to be big on that.

There is such a thing as an LPN to BSN but no guarantee that you would have it in your area. I don't know of anyone in my original LPN to RN program that is an RN whereas I am an RN with a BSN who is in a MSN program for NP.

You could potentially max out in your education loans. If you keep on going from certificate to associate to BSN you may have SAP issues but a lot of schools will let you write a letter and get an exemption from satisfactory academic progress but no guarantee.

Larry3373

Specializes in Critical Care; Recovery. Has 2 years experience.

I believe LPN is a waste of time if your goal is RN. They make a lot less than RNs and you will find it difficult to get a hospital job. I would just try to get into an ADN program or a BSN program. You can talk to financial aid to confirm how much aid you can get.

Lpn is not waste of time. You might have everything you need to get into adn or Bsn program but you don't get accepted. What I am saying don't put all your eggs in one basket. Apply too all Lpn, adn, bsn

Larry3373

Specializes in Critical Care; Recovery. Has 2 years experience.

Lpn is not waste of time. You might have everything you need to get into adn or Bsn program but you don't get accepted. What I am saying don't put all your eggs in one basket. Apply too all Lpn, adn, bsn

I agree about not putting all your eggs in one basket. My concern would be for the person who's goal is RN, that an LPN program could cause a drop in your GPA, making it difficult to get accepted in an RN bridge program later. Also, if the OP is not able to get into an RN program now before LPN school, what will have changed after LPN school that will cause them to be more successful?

applesxoranges, BSN, RN

Specializes in ER.

I agree about not putting all your eggs in one basket. My concern would be for the person who's goal is RN, that an LPN program could cause a drop in your GPA, making it difficult to get accepted in an RN bridge program later. Also, if the OP is not able to get into an RN program now before LPN school, what will have changed after LPN school that will cause them to be more successful?

There seems to be less waiting list or competition for LPN to RN program in my area. My friends were able to start clinicals a lot quicker than the waiting list for the traditional RN program or had less competition. My friend who failed out of the RN program went to the LPN program and is now in the LPN to RN program with credit for the RN classes he passed.

Well, I would look at going straight to RN in some form. I saved money by getting my ADN and I was able to find work right away. I almost did my LPN program but it would have cost a lot more to do a LPN program. Some of them cost as much as an ADN! My former classmates also have yet to get their RN even though they have been graduated for awhile. For some people, they find adding the extra year on worth it so they can get some work experience.

I would look at six programs, preferably mix of BSN and ADN. Research requirements, passing rates for NCLEX, and cost. Limit it down to three or four and aim to get into those programs. Some have wait lists, some programs do not.

In my experience, hospitals and sometimes nursing homes will pay for people to go back to school. Agencies do not seem to be big on that.

There is such a thing as an LPN to BSN but no guarantee that you would have it in your area. I don't know of anyone in my original LPN to RN program that is an RN whereas I am an RN with a BSN who is in a MSN program for NP.

You could potentially max out in your education loans. If you keep on going from certificate to associate to BSN you may have SAP issues but a lot of schools will let you write a letter and get an exemption from satisfactory academic progress but no guarantee.

Thank you:)

I have another question. There is a community college close by that offers ADN and ability to sit for NCLEX (that is, presuming I get into the nursing clinicals after their "pre-med courses.. :( I don't want to be put on a waiting list) for not terribly expensive but taking maybe 3-4years (depending ft or pt). I thought it would be a good idea to do that program so I could then work, see if I want to go further. I thought that maybe after graduating I could secure a job that might offer Ed reimbursement (of course no guarantee).

I'm worried that if I did decide to continue from that point on, would my degree from a community college and licensed be looked at as any less than when trying to get into a BSN bridge?

I should mention there is also a health science college here that is wicked expensive (at about $515/credit). They offer an ADN, a BSN (2+2 program), or LPN-RN...this is all aside from the trade school that simply offers LPN