LPN

  1. I am an LPN with 3 yrs experience. I live in South Carolina and LPNs here are phased out to long term care or rehab. Corrections is safer than LTC. I have been in healthcare for 20 yrs total as a CNA and Unit Secretary and monitor tech. I think I'm really burnt out on bedside nursing especially in LTC. What administrative positions are there for LPNs? I reallt wanna finish and earn my RN but the Local community college has been very hard to return to. The instructors are very intimidating and picky. If they want you, your in. If not they will find any reason to not let you back in. The struggle is real and I'm exhausted mentally. Any suggestions please??
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    About aclipe72

    Joined: Oct '18; Posts: 2

    5 Comments

  3. by   cyc0sys
    I understand where you're coming from because I've been down the same roads. Unfortunately, you really don't have many options to work administratively as an LPN. If you know HEDIS you may be able to do chart review for an agency or work for an MDS coordinator. Some insurances companies hire LPNs to work in call centers that provide basic health advice.

    You might want to considering going back for Respiratory Therapist or Rad Tech instead of RN. Most bridge programs only offer 3-6 credits for LPN schooling, so it's not like you'd really lose out.
  4. by   aclipe72
    What is HEDIS? I wonder if there is just a great of need for Rad-tech or Resp Therapist? If I can pass check offs at my local community college, I'd have 2 semesters for RN! But the check offs are so intimidating and the instructors know this. They love making people a nervous wreck. I'm hoping and praying that the interviews I have next week, one is for a MD office, that I will get thst one! Thank you for your response!!
  5. by   cyc0sys
    Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) is a tool health plans to measure health care performance. Unless someone paid to train you with qualifying experience, it's probably out of reach.

    Sounds like your basics are knocked out for RN (chemistry, microbio, A&P 1&2, HGD, Foundations, Pharm, etc,,) so it would probably be best to complete your clinical semesters instead of reworking the RT route just yet.

    3 years as an LPN in the LTC, Rehab, and Corrections should more than prepare you for clinical. Pt safety, ABCs, ADPIE, Maslow's Hierarchy, and critical medications.

    I think the MD office will be a welcomed change. Best of luck.
  6. by   adventure_rn
    Quote from cyc0sys
    I understand where you're coming from because I've been down the same roads. Unfortunately, you really don't have many options to work administratively as an LPN. If you know HEDIS you may be able to do chart review for an agency or work for an MDS coordinator. Some insurances companies hire LPNs to work in call centers that provide basic health advice.

    You might want to considering going back for Respiratory Therapist or Rad Tech instead of RN. Most bridge programs only offer 3-6 credits for LPN schooling, so it's not like you'd really lose out.
    I completely agree with the first part of cyc0sys's advice, but I'm not sure about the second piece. RT or x-ray would take you in a different direction from nursing, but it is still very much bedside care. There is even less room for advancement in non-nursing ancillary roles (like RT and imaging) than there is in nursing, so if your goal is to get away from the bedside then I don't think that's the right route. However, if your plan is to simply make a change, then it could work. Do realize that RT and x-ray programs are just as intimidating and nit-picky as nursing programs. For instance, my x-ray tech friend who graduated a few years ago said that nobody in the program was allowed to sit down during their entire 8 hour clinical day even if they weren't doing anything, which sounds miserable.
  7. by   cyc0sys
    Quote from adventure_rn
    I completely agree with the first part of cyc0sys's advice, but I'm not sure about the second piece. RT or x-ray would take you in a different direction from nursing, but it is still very much bedside care. There is even less room for advancement in non-nursing ancillary roles (like RT and imaging) than there is in nursing, so if your goal is to get away from the bedside then I don't think that's the right route. However, if your plan is to simply make a change, then it could work. Do realize that RT and x-ray programs are just as intimidating and nit-picky as nursing programs. For instance, my x-ray tech friend who graduated a few years ago said that nobody in the program was allowed to sit down during their entire 8 hour clinical day even if they weren't doing anything, which sounds miserable.
    Even as an RN-ADN, OP will still have to do bedside unless she goes into school nurse or health clinic. I've seen insurance companies offer new grad positions for phone triage but outside of experience or a BSN, admin options are limited.

    RT or Rad Tech programs, where I'm from aren't as heavily wait listed. The requirements for admission, courses, grades, and clinical hours isn't as stringent as nursing. But this obvious varies by area and it doesn't change the fact you're still going to work your butt off. I simply suggested this as a backup or alternative if OP decides bridging isn't for her.

    While some treatments and diagnostics are done by RT at the bedside, managing vents and neb tx aren't the same a bedside nursing. Rad Tech involves zero bedside.

    The advancement potential and wide variety of specialties for RN is a huge selling point. But that comes with a great deal more of responsibilities, yet the pay for RT is comparable to RN, ADN with 0 years of experience. If RT doesn't do their job, it still falls on the RN if patient has a negative outcome. The inverse doesn't apply. The other downside is for RT is work location. You may have to move to find work since there isn't a huge turnover like nursing.

    Rad Tech doesn't possess the huge job possibilities as RN but there is lots of room for career advancement by certification and education. You may have to move to find work since, once again, there isn't a huge turnover like nursing.

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