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Nurse --> Family Law Attorney experience?

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by dmwolfe dmwolfe (New) New

I am currently a second career RN (was a history major at an Ivy, went into PR and marketing for 8 years, which sucked my soul away, then I did a direct entry masters at Hopkins because I have always loved health/wellness and helping people) and have been working inpatient pediatrics at Hopkins for two years. While I LOVE working with families and children, I really dislike that there is very little autonomy in my role (e.g. input is not considered by medical team even when they end up pursuing the route suggested anyway), I'm not using my critical thinking skills as much as I thought I would, and it just seems like the hospital is heaping more and more on nursing without pay/career advancement. I was considering becoming a PNP-PC, but I'm not sure I love medicine enough to invest the time into an NP degree. The one thing I have discovered through nursing is that I love the social aspect of nursing and want want to help families in a broader scope than direct care - we see so many families come through that are hampered by custody rulings, abuse victims who are returned to the abuser (even with ample evidence) and then end up dead. TLDR: Does anyone have experience with parlaying their RN experience into a law degree? I think this would allow me to have a broader impact on families/healthcare, more autonomy and would play to my love for research, organization, and writing. Also, if it's of any help, I'm 34, so regardless of whether I go back to school for law or NP, I'll be 37 ish when I finish up, but age is just a number :) Thx in advance!

NRSKarenRN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Vents, Telemetry, Home Care, Home infusion. Has 44 years experience.

Yes, several RN's have transitioned to JD degree. Be aware law school grads facing saturated marketplace these days.

You might want to contact Loris Brown, RN, JD - AN's Medical Legal columnist

https://allnurses.com/profile/1071007-lorie-brown-RN-mn-jd/

Quote

I'm not using my critical thinking skills as much as I thought I would, and it just seems like the hospital is heaping more and more on nursing without pay/career advancement. I was considering becoming a PNP-PC, but I'm not sure I love medicine enough to invest the time into an NP degree.

Since your working at John Hopkins, with many medical students/interns/residents, you may find that working at a different hospitals pediatric unit/Children's hospital be more receptive to nursing input.

Best wishes in future career.

thank you so much! I appreciate your constructive input and directing me toward a resource.

NRSKarenRN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Vents, Telemetry, Home Care, Home infusion. Has 44 years experience.

Nemours Children Hospital in Wilmington, DE well respected, nurses seem satisfied with work/life balance.

https://www.nemours.org/