Non Nursing Bachelors to CRNA

Nurses Career Support

Published

Hi,

I recently graduated from a university with a BA in Psychology.

I wanted to know if there are any programs that will let me get a Masters in Nursing with a speciality in Anesthesia for non nursing degree holders. I know Columbia University in New York does! :up: Any other programs?

Please let me know. I couldn't find any besides Columbia.

I'm hoping someone will help me out so I can start the application process.

I welcome all suggestions.

MiaNJ

198 Posts

I though Columbia required at least 1 year critical care clinical experience to even eligible to start the CRNA program. Thus, you would have to have an RN license.

Did someone tell you that you didn't need to be an RN to enter the program? You can be an RN without a Bachelor's degree, of course. There are RNs with an Associate's degree, and some may have a Bachelor's in another field.

I think there are combined BS/MS programs, where you would first get your Bachelor's then work on your Masters. I think Columbia may offer this.

I don't think there is a direct entry just for the MS without having an RN license. Anyway, I think if you want to be a CRNA, you have to have some experience in nursing.

Specializes in Case Mgmt, Anesthesia, ICU, ER, Dialysis.

Trust me, you won't live through a CRNA program without nursing experience, VERY preferably in critical care. Not saying that to be ugly, or cast aspersions on your intellect...I just know the hell I've been through over the past year in my program.

Nursing experience is non-negotiable. Some places will let you in with an ADN in nursing if you have a bachelor's in another field. This is a particular favorite option of the bachelor-prepared respiratory therapists...get their ADN and go to CRNA school. One of the programs in Miami does this, but I don't know specifically which one - could find out if you wanted.

Milu123

4 Posts

Hey All,

I'm sorry what I meant was a program that will let me get my BS and MS in nursing. Columbia's programs is around four years and you get a BS and then an MS in a specialty you choose (nurse anesthesia is an option). It's a combined BS/MS program. Are there any other programs like that for students holding bachelors in others fields?

Thanks a lot everyone :wink2:

Ps. Also, does any one know how practical programs like DePaul and Rush's masters programs are please let me know. They offer masters in nursing to non nursing degree holders. I belive Rush's program is called GEM (General Entry Masters to Nursing) and DePaul's MENP (Masters Entry to Nursing Practice). After going through this program I can sit to take the NCLEX.

BUT.....

Will I be able to obtain a job in acute care if I go through these masters programs or will I have a difficult time finding a job? I know that it will be hard enough for students who go through the traditional RN/BSN track track to find a job in acute care in this economy. What are my odds if I do the MENP or GEM program? I guess it's better to find out early. :banghead:

:confused:

If someone can help me please do. All suggestions welcome. More karma pts. for anyone who can help.

nrz2bee

72 Posts

Specializes in CNA in LTC, Hospital.

Have u looked into the university of rochester's nursing program? Or Pace University has a combined 1 yr BSN/MSN but u must already have a BS/BA in another field plus have taken the GRE. Molloy has an accelerated BSN/MSN program too for people who have a degree already. i am not sure which of these schools have a CRNA MS program.

redmymind

6 Posts

I did the accelerated program at Columbia and was able to find an ICU job after my BSN. Yes, it is harder to get a job in critical care as a new grad, but it definitely can be done. I applied to around 25 ICU positions and got interviews at 4 hospitals. From the time I took my Boards to my time of hire was about 1.5 months.

Programs other than Columbia that offer accelerated BSN (for those who hold a Bachelor's in another field) to CRNA programs include UPenn and Georgetown. Duke also has an accelerated BSN program, but you would still have to apply to their CRNA program after finishing your BSN (it is not direct entry). But provided you do well in your BSN, Duke would prefer to accept one of their own students into the CRNA program than a lateral student.

Hope some of this helps.

ED_RN

10 Posts

Specializes in CICU.

It is actually a national requirement to have experience in critical care before entering a CRNA program.

Direct from the AANA's website:

http://www.aana.com/BecomingCRNA.aspx?ucNavMenu_TSMenuTargetID=18&ucNavMenu_TSMenuTargetType=4&ucNavMenu_TSMenuID=6&id=1018

987!

393 Posts

Downstate in Brooklyn has a CRNA program

Specializes in Critical Care, Education.

Very interesting thread, with lots of great information from posters. However, I would like to respond to the issue that the OP posted about jobs for MSN new grads.

"Will I be able to obtain a job in acute care if I go through these masters programs or will I have a difficult time finding a job? I know that it will be hard enough for students who go through the traditional RN/BSN track track to find a job in acute care in this economy. What are my odds if I do the MENP or GEM program? I guess it's better to find out early"

There is a dichotomy in all types of professional education, including nursing ... theoretical/academic versus actual practice. New graduate nurses are pretty much all looked at the same way, no matter what their underlying degree may be.... they are all 'newbies' that require high levels of support and development in order to achieve competency and work independently.

A new grad from a direct-entry MSN program may actually be less attractive than the new grad BSN or ADN if they appear to expect more recognition and perks. The 'higher degree' does not make them any more valuable at the bedside or in patient care because the clinical portion of their education is pretty much the same. If a hiring manager has been burned by any new grad prima donnas whose demands exceed those of more experienced staff, he/she would naturally be reluctant to hire anyone that would appear to have this type of baggage. MSN new grads would be well-advised to make an extra effort to be humble when applying for jobs.

+ Add a Comment

By using the site, you agree with our Policies. X