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New Grad offered position at Newark Beth, night shift, HELP!!!!

First Year   (2,860 Views | 7 Replies)

1,929 Profile Views; 28 Posts

Hello all

I am a new grad (june 5th) who took nclex (june 23rd) and was recently offered a position at newark beth israel, full time, nights. I was hoping to get some advice and guidance from you all. I didn't really want night shift, because I'm a day/ morning person, so im a bit aprehensive. How do you all manage? How is it working full time as a new grad? any pointers? Anyone work at beth israel that would like to offer advice/ input???

Thankyou all in advance!!!!:cat:

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thatsthekeyRNC specializes in NICU.

194 Posts; 3,524 Profile Views

Congrats on the job!! Night shift can be a difficult transition for a lot of people, but it seems that the available jobs in hospitals are usually night shift! I am a night person and I function better on night shift than I did on day shift so it wasn't too difficult for me, but I understand your concern.

I would definitely stick it out and see how you can adjust because you might like it, or you might eventually be able to switch to day shift. In the beginning my life just had to revolve around work and my sleep schedule until I figured out what worked for me. Good luck!

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vanessaem has 5 years experience as a BSN, RN.

147 Posts; 3,971 Profile Views

Being that jobs are pretty hard to come by, especially for a new grad, I would take it and learn to adapt. I've had my license since March and no one wants to hire me because I'm a new grad with no experience working as a nurse. I'd be grateful for whatever I can get at this point. Normally, new grads don't have the option or luxury to be picky and choosy about work shifts and night shifts are usually what's offered.

Night shifts are hard at first but I'm sure you'll get used to it. Congrats on the new job.

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28 Posts; 1,929 Profile Views

Thanks!!! I didn't mean to come off as complaining ( i am exceptionally grateful to be even offered the position), its just the nerves of having a real full time job as an RN is getting to me, and being on nights is just adding to that. I am super excited!!!!

Any tips for this new RN?? :)

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DisneyNurseGal has 8 years experience as a BSN, RN.

568 Posts; 11,822 Profile Views

I. LOVE. WORKING. NIGHTS. If you would have told me (before I started this job) that I would love working nights I would have told you that you were nuts. I started my first job on a Med Surg / Oncology unit in January 2014 and I have TWICE passed up an opportunity my by manager to switch to days. Nights is a better environment to learn IMO. Not all patients sleep so it is not a cake walk, but I love doing chart checks, because it is a great way to really start understanding what is going on with your patients. There are less doctors floating around so you get less orders and can focus on the current care plan. The nurses on my unit at night are such a family, we truly help each other out.

How I set up my schedule is the night before a shift I purposely stay up til like 2 or 3 am so I can sleep late, work the first night, second, night and third. After my third (and final) shift of the week is finished, I wake up early (about noon - 4 ish hours of sleep) so I can go back to bed at normal time.

Take the job, and try to go in with an open mind, once I accepted my nighttime fate, I really started to enjoy it.

Good luck!

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HouTx has 35 years experience as a BSN, MSN, EdD and specializes in Critical Care, Education.

9,051 Posts; 45,287 Profile Views

It's very normal to be anxious about trying something new - whether it's changing your hairstyle, bungee jumping, going on a blind date, or working nights. Unlike past generations of diploma nurses, today's nursing students have never had any exposure to working at night. After you try it, the 'strangeness' will go away. You'll be surprised at how quickly you adapt.

Night shifts are usually much more relaxed. Staff is more cohesive, with more teamwork evident to accomplish difficult tasks or bail you out if you're overwhelmed. Fewer patient 'road trips' (for diagnostic testing or therapy) so you never have to hunt for your patient when meds are due. No major disruptions for physician rounding & dealing with the consequent avalanche of new orders. The most irritating issues? Daytime 'mandatory' events (staff meetings, inservices, etc) that disrupt your schedule.

True story - when I worked nights (11p-7A), my kids (grade school) didn't realize I worked. I found out when a teacher called me to see if I could help out with a school event. I explained my need to sleep during the day & she told me that my offspring was clueless. When I investigated, the kids both thought I was just liked to sleep late in the morning so Dad had to get them up and ready for school.

You can do this. You may even discover that you are a natural 'night owl' after all.

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28 Posts; 1,929 Profile Views

Thank you all for your help! Your words have definitely helped calm my nerves! Now I'm just ansty to begin orientation. 2 weeks to go!!!!

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1,295 Posts; 17,633 Profile Views

That's hilarious HouTx!*L*

I, too, enjoy nights! Not many drs around, no admin around, and as others said, the staff tend to have more team work! I oriented on days for 5 weeks, then moved to nights. Gave me a chance to meet all the drs and such. I don't really have a hard time adjusting. I take a nap before my first shift, from about 12-2, then am good to go. I will sleep from about 8-3 or 4. Nights are still busy, so I don't usually get tired on shift. If we do have a slow day I will start getting sleepy about 2 or 3. That is when I will go around and empty garbage cans and linen bags and such, to keep myself busy! Congrats on the job!

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