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New grad initiative for BSCN ONtario grads?

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by sallybee sallybee (Member)

1,005 Visitors; 18 Posts

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Hi

I am deciding between several nursing programs i gain admittance to.

My main concern is that I wish to work in the ICU As soon as possible right out of nursing school. I am doing a BSCN of which I have two years left.

I am mainly worried that I will not be able to secure a job out of graduation. I am physically small, less than 100 pounds with a thin bone structure and I cannot do very much in terms of pivot transfers and dressing and undressing patients. Thus, I cannot work long term care unless I want my back broken.

I heard of the ontario new grad initiative where new grads can be given a job for 6 months into any speciality. I am wondering if that includes ICU?

Even if it is just 6 month, id be more than happy since that allows me to get my foot into the door for an ICU program.

Is this program still functioning?

What is the hiring status for new grads in Ontario and how much are they paid?

Has anybody heard of a new grad bscn from Ontario getting an externship in the States and then working there? I am an american citizen.

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1,690 Visitors; 137 Posts

Yes it still exists but you can only pick from what they offer you. Some of the jobs offered aren't even hospitals.

Since the economy isn't so pretty right now, you won't expect ICUs hiring new grads any time soon. It cost a lot of $$ to train new grads in med/surg floors let alone in ICUs. Don't worry about it too much right now, you have two years to go. Only time will tell if they'll open up and hire new grads. Me, on the other hand, I am not so lucky because I'm graduating this year. I'm ready to be aggressively looking for a job by dec./jan.

If the economy is still in the downer two years from now. Go and invest on a ACLS course, it could potentially make you stand out.

I am physically small, less than 100 pounds with a thin bone structure and I cannot do very much in terms of pivot transfers and dressing and undressing patients. Thus, I cannot work long term care unless I want my back broken.

ICU nurses do a lot of back breaking work as well. In fact, I don't know what kind of hospital nurse that doesn't unless their in management/administration/research. Have you ever done CPR? There are a lot of those in the ICU. I'm short and I have to lower the bed AND get on the bed in order to give CPR to a coding patient. My advice, beef up! Trust me. Build stronger back and arm muscles.

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1,673 Visitors; 36 Posts

I totally agree with the bulking up. I know alot of girls who are underweight and how difficult it is to gain weight. You have 2 yrs to work towards building strength and definition...its in your best interest and also the safety of the patients to have more strength.

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NotReady4PrimeTime has 25 years experience as a RN and works as a RN, CNCCP(C).

16 Articles; 71,188 Visitors; 7,350 Posts

m'aidez is quite correct about the backbreaking component of ICU nursing. Even in the pediatric ICU there are many 'heavy-lifting' sorts of activities. From pushing stretchers to pushing around huge pieces of equipment to transfering patients from stretcher to bed to stretcher to CT table to stretcher to bed, to turning and repositioning comatose/sedated/paralyzed patients who are dead weight, and of course CPR, it's not a physically undemanding job.

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