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New Early College High School - HELP!

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Specializes in Med-Surg, Home Health, Hospice, School. Has 10 years experience.

My district will be adding a early college high school next year, and I have been chosen to the be the nurse. Grades will be 9-12. Students will essentially be given the opportunity to earn an associates degree and a high school diploma simultaneously. Students will be going back and forth from the HS campus to the college for classes throughout the day. This is a new concept and no one in my district can give me any insight as to how things will be different and what type of things should be taken into consideration as far the health office is concerned. I do know that the HS and college are treated as two separate entities and that at the college level, students information (of all types: grades, health, etc) are protected from the parent/guardian (as in it cannot be shared without the student's consent).

Is anyone here currently who has or has previously had any experience working in a school like this that can provide me with any pointers/insight? Any and all advice/recommendations would be greatly appreciated.

ruby_jane, BSN, RN

Specializes in ICU/community health/school nursing. Has 10 years experience.

So you're in the high school, and the students are transported to the college and back, right? You're not responsible for the general college population, only the high school students?

We are in our first year of this and my colleague finds it no different than regular high school nursing. The students still come in for band aids for boo boos and sore throats of six days' duration. She did get a hundred or so more students from other parts of the district and had to scramble to get those health folders and make sure that any allergies or chronic conditions were documented.

Technically FERPA doesn't apply IN COLLEGE. However, the kids are still in high school (where FERPA applies). That's a district issue, and I'm not sure they'll be successful if a parent really leans on that. You need to treat all students as though FERPA applies, and chart accordingly!

crazynursebsn

Specializes in Med-Surg, Home Health, Hospice, School. Has 10 years experience.

So you're in the high school, and the students are transported to the college and back, right? You're not responsible for the general college population, only the high school students?

We are in our first year of this and my colleague finds it no different than regular high school nursing. The students still come in for band aids for boo boos and sore throats of six days' duration. She did get a hundred or so more students from other parts of the district and had to scramble to get those health folders and make sure that any allergies or chronic conditions were documented.

Technically FERPA doesn't apply IN COLLEGE. However, the kids are still in high school (where FERPA applies). That's a district issue, and I'm not sure they'll be successful if a parent really leans on that. You need to treat all students as though FERPA applies, and chart accordingly!

I still have a lot to learn about FERPA. I will admit that I need to further educate myself on that. I'm use to working with HIPPA, not so much FERPA. I have been told (as it relates to the ECHS) that I am not allowed to share student health information with college employees (even if I would consider them a "need to know" person, such as an instructor). I'm so confused by that since the student is still technically a minor. In addition to that, if a medical emergency happens to one of my students while they're at the college, how will I know?

I've searched the internet to try and get more info as it pertains to the ECHS concept and the health office, but can't seem to find much out there.

ruby_jane, BSN, RN

Specializes in ICU/community health/school nursing. Has 10 years experience.

I have been told (as it relates to the ECHS) that I am not allowed to share student health information with college employees (even if I would consider them a "need to know" person, such as an instructor). I'm so confused by that since the student is still technically a minor. In addition to that, if a medical emergency happens to one of my students while they're at the college, how will I know? .

AHHH. Ok. Not the parents. The other teachers. In conference with our nurse at the early high school, she communicates to the teachers who are on campus (9th and 10th grade) but does not send communication out to the college teachers (11th and 12th). Sounds like you're going to have the opportunity to make up your own policies!