Jump to content

Need Some Encouragement From Ob Nurses...

Ob/Gyn   (1,181 Views 6 Comments)
by *Andrea* *Andrea* (Member)

*Andrea* has 3 years experience .

1,493 Profile Views; 31 Posts

Just graduated May 15th, am starting my first job on a postpartum unit on Monday. I need some encouragement! I look in the "First Year in Nursing" forums and see how many new grads are terrified to go to work every day which in turn makes me even more terrified to initially start my job so I was hoping some more experienced nurses could give me a little encouragement and support. I'm scared!!

Andrea

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

SmilingBluEyes has 20 years experience.

2 Followers; 19,552 Posts; 65,012 Profile Views

Hi and welcome to the forum! Check out the above "sticky" threads for some good resources and ideas/information. Just make sure you ask, ask, ask any and all questions that arise in your orientation and just relax and enjoy it!

It WILL Be ok!!!!

Welcome to OB nursing; I hope you truly enjoy your new career. Good luck to you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Are you a credible source? Add your Credentials, Experience, etc.

379 Posts; 6,680 Profile Views

Andrea, You are going to do fine. There is an awful lot to learn in post-partum. Ask lots and lots of questions. Remember, your biggest job is to teach new parents how to be parents - and to give them the encouragement to make them believe they can do it themselves.

Congratulations!!! Let us know how things are going.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

everthesame has 12 years experience as a LPN, LVN.

188 Posts; 3,971 Profile Views

Congrats on the new degree and the new job.

As others have already said, ask questions...lots of questions. Education and emotional support are a huge part of postpartum nursing. Most of your moms and babies will be healthy and have physically uneventful stays on your postpartum unit. That is not to say you won't see a mom or baby become unstable. Unfortunately that will happen even on the best units. Both mom and baby go through huge physiologic changes shortly after the delivery. As you become proficient with the typical "normal" postpartum and newborn patients it will become easier for you to spot the abnormal patients. Your orientation should cover some of the more common complications. Something to remember is that you are not going to be the only nurse on the unit. If there is something going on with one of your patients ask for someone else's opinion. Even after 10 years, I still sometimes ask my coworkers to come look at something for me.

Also, don't forget that a c-section is a major abdominal surgery and you will have to watch out for the usual post op complications.

If your hospital has lactation consultants ask to see if you can shadow one for a few hours. For me, breastfeeding support is the most challenging aspect of postpartum nursing. When breastfeeding goes smoothly it is an amazing thing to behold. When breastfeeding doesn't go smoothly you have to troubleshoot. A lot of times mom may think there is something wrong with her or she will be unable to successfully breastfeed her baby. These moms need a lot of extra TLC to get them through the "bumpy" period and not give up on breastfeeding. When things finally click for mom and baby it is very fulfilling.

Good luck with your new career and keep us updated on how things are going.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Montessori Mommy specializes in L & D.

231 Posts; 3,935 Profile Views

Andrea,

I start my first job on Monday also - on a labor & delivery unit. (Monday I'm in human resources for their training, but Tuesday I go to the floor!!) I'm nervous and excited. Other than going to school, I've been a stay-at-home mom for eight years, so I'm really more concerned about how going back to work will affect my family.

I did my Women's Health clinicals on the floor where I'll be workng, so I know some of the nurses, and I know where to find supplies and the bathroom!! (That always helps on your first day!)

Best of luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FLIPA specializes in OB/GYN, NB Nursery.

14 Posts; 1,052 Profile Views

You ladies should be assigned to a preceptor--another nurse employed on the unit and who is proficient and knowledgable; especially for L&D. Where I work, the two nurses are assigned the same shift and work together as a team for the duration of the new nurse's orientation to the floor. It takes 6 months to really learn everything you need to know to be safe. And then you never let your guard down, because things can go wrong very quickly in L&D. Hospitals don't always see it that way; especially if there are staffing issues (everywhere!!). Good Luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
×