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Need help to boost my GPA higher

Posted

Specializes in Nephrology. Has 3 years experience.

Hello. My GPA is below 3.0 and I want to improove my chances in getting accepted to graduate school (MSN-FNP in particular). I don't have a lot of information on how to take specific classes in a certain school, or what subjects to choose. Any thoughts or ideas anybody can give me is greatly appreciated.

Thank you!

Sour Lemon

Has 9 years experience.

Hello. My GPA is below 3.0 and I want to improove my chances in getting accepted to graduate school (MSN-FNP in particular). I don't have a lot of information on how to take specific classes in a certain school, or what subjects to choose. Any thoughts or ideas anybody can give me is greatly appreciated.

Thank you!

It's best to find a few schools you're interested in and see how they calculate GPA for purposes of admittance. If an A in basket weaving won't help, why waste time and money on it?

Double-Helix, BSN, RN

Specializes in PICU, Sedation/Radiology, PACU. Has 9 years experience.

Have you already completed your undergraduate degree? I'm assuming that you have, given that you have BSN in your screen name and note 3 years of experience. In that case, it may not be possible to raise your GPA. Generally, once you've completed a degree, your GPA is what it is. Your GPA for your BSN program is 3.0. You've already completed the program, and thus are likely not eligible to retake those courses in order to raise your GPA. Similarly, even if you could retake certain courses, the your new grade doesn't replace the old grade. Rather, it would be weighted or averaged, so considering a 4 year program, 4-5 repeat courses is only likely to increase your GPA by a few tenths of a point, if you score very highly.

An alternative might be to pursue a second bachelors degree, but this would be expensive and likely not very helpful if your goal is a nursing focused graduate program.

I think your best avenue is to score very highly on your GRE and get some great letters of recommendation from colleagues associated with the graduate program you want to enter (regarded former alumni, for example). I would also provide an explanation for your low GPA in your admissions letter and detail what changes you have made to become a more successful graduate student.

Good luck!

rizahawkeye, BSN, RN

Specializes in Nephrology. Has 3 years experience.

Thank you for your responses. I do have BSN. I was an international student but have RN experiences here in US. I applied for the FNP program in University of Cincinnati but was denied. I have sent an email if I can get information on any specific reasons why I was denied so I can improve myself. I know that the GPA hit me pretty hard and I do not have a GRE to back me up. Seeing a lot of threads about people giving advice on re-taking some undergrad subjects is not so assuring, since, like what you said, it is impossible and it could be expensive. I am thinking if I shoult try in a different school, get better letters of recommendation and/or taking the GRE this time. I am now realizing that I should have explained in my essay why I had a low gpa. I'm also wondering which schools to apply next.

Thank you.

rizahawkeye, BSN, RN

Specializes in Nephrology. Has 3 years experience.

It's best to find a few schools you're interested in and see how they calculate GPA for purposes of admittance. If an A in basket weaving won't help, why waste time and money on it?

True. The MSN school I applied to required a minimum cumulative gpa of 3.0 in the last degree earned. Mine was BSN. All grad nursing schools are highly competetive. :/

AceOfHearts<3

Specializes in Critical care.

I think taking the GRE could really help. I have also heard of people taking a couple of grad school classes (harder math and science courses) to prove they can be successful. Definitely reach out to the schools to see what they are looking for and how you can improve your application.

Good luck!