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NEED ADVICE

I am currently 2nd year at the University of Guelph in science and have applied for nursing at Ottawa , Laurentian and Northern College. I was really hoping to get into Ottawa as my parents live there and I could be at home. They did not accept me, I needed an 80%+ average and don't currently have that. Im accepted at Laurentian and Northern College but not too excited about possibly spending 4 years in Sudbury or Timmins... Ottawa doesn't take 2nd year transfers so I would have to finish my degree.

Should I stay in science and get my average higher for Ottawa nursing the following year? Or get right into it now that I can. If I stay in Guelph another year, I feel that I will just finish my bachelor since I only have 2 years left.

Im not sure what I would do with my degree if I stay in just science, I know how competitive med schools, etc are! Second-entry nursing programs are very competitive as well.

WHAT SHOULD I DO!

I went into a science program at uOttawa for a year after highschool and then switched into nursing at Mohawk-McMaster and now I am done and trying to find a job. I switched for the same reason as you, I thought med-school was too competitive and with a science degree you have to continue your education. But even with nursing its not easy finding a job in the GTA area as a new grad, so I am also considering continuing my education. If you look at other posts in this forum you ll see nursing is not as high in demand as the ontario government says it is due to the deficit.

I am currently 2nd year at the University of Guelph in science and have applied for nursing at Ottawa , Laurentian and Northern College. I was really hoping to get into Ottawa as my parents live there and I could be at home. They did not accept me, I needed an 80%+ average and don't currently have that. Im accepted at Laurentian and Northern College but not too excited about possibly spending 4 years in Sudbury or Timmins... Ottawa doesn't take 2nd year transfers so I would have to finish my degree.

Should I stay in science and get my average higher for Ottawa nursing the following year? Or get right into it now that I can. If I stay in Guelph another year, I feel that I will just finish my bachelor since I only have 2 years left.

Im not sure what I would do with my degree if I stay in just science, I know how competitive med schools, etc are! Second-entry nursing programs are very competitive as well.

WHAT SHOULD I DO!

Hi bubbles3012,

Although I am not able to tell you what you should do I can share with you my story as I feel it is very similar to yours. I went to U of G and realized in my second year my science degree would not get me very far and I didn't have a real passion for any of the jobs or education that would come out of it. I didn't have any previous exposure to nursing but as I learned more about it I knew it was perfect for me. I did not have the grades to transfer to a 4 year BScN degree, but if I had have I know I would've gone anywhere to do the program. I applied to several RPN programs and got accepted. I ended up deciding I wanted to finish my undergrad degree having already put two years in. I worked hard to get my grades up so I could apply to second entry programs. I am now finishing up my 1st year in Western's compressed 2 year program.

At the time, the decision of where to go and what to do with my education was terrifying. Looking back now I see that there wasn't really a wrong choice as they all would've got me where I needed to go in the end. So my first piece of advice is try not to stress too much!

If you switch to a 4 year program now or if you finish your current 4 year degree and then do an accelerated 2 year nursing program you will have 4 more years in total either way. Yes the second entry programs are competitive but if I can do it I promise you can do it! My overall average went from in the high 60s in 2nd year to a 75 by graduation. Most of the second entry programs only look at your last two years or your final year. That being said I did not have the variety of choices in schools that some other people did, but I was just happy to get in. I guess what it comes down to is do you want the guarantee of being in a nursing program now even if you have to sacrifice location, or would you rather work towards a different program with the hopes of having more say in where you are. In terms of time, money, job outcomes, etc. the options are similar.

Regardless of when or where you do your BScN make sure it is something you are passionate about rather then just something to get a job. Our 2 year program is very demanding and I know when I get done I still won't have first pick at my dream job. There will always be nursing jobs but as a new grad you don't get to be as picky about the location or specialty.

Hope that helps :)

Wow, you were in the exact same position I am in. Thank you so much for sharing your story!

I am in biological sciences and currently have a 72% average.. Did you find the courses got a bit easier in upper years or you developed better study habits rather?

What made you choose not to switch into the RPN programs?

Also for second-entry nursing, did you need a reference letter? If so, how can we get a reference in Guelph, with the class sizes being so large!

Wow, you were in the exact same position I am in. Thank you so much for sharing your story!

I am in biological sciences and currently have a 72% average.. Did you find the courses got a bit easier in upper years or you developed better study habits rather?

What made you choose not to switch into the RPN programs?

Also for second-entry nursing, did you need a reference letter? If so, how can we get a reference in Guelph, with the class sizes being so large!

My grades definitely improved because of my study habits, but I also had more of an interest in my classes. I knew that in order to get in I had to get essentially everything over 80 in the last two years.

If I switched to RPN I was going to essentially lose the first two years of university and all the time and money I spent. I wouldn't get any transfer credits going from university to college. I felt like it was a waste. BUT if I had've had an option to switch to a 4 year BScN and use some of my credits as transfer credits then I probably wouldn't have felt that way.

The only school I applied to that required an academic reference letter was U of T. I taught swimming lessons at the pool on campus and I had a prof's kids on more then one occasion. I took her class, met with her on several occasions for school, and sat in the front row. However, I didn't get in to U of T and you don't get to see the reference letter so I can't really say whether or not that worked in my favour.

I thought I had a good supplementary app for U of T and McMaster, but I didn't get in to these places so in the end (ironically) it was my grades that got me in. I got accepted at Trent, Humber, and Western.

My grades definitely improved because of my study habits, but I also had more of an interest in my classes. I knew that in order to get in I had to get essentially everything over 80 in the last two years.

If I switched to RPN I was going to essentially lose the first two years of university and all the time and money I spent. I wouldn't get any transfer credits going from university to college. I felt like it was a waste. BUT if I had've had an option to switch to a 4 year BScN and use some of my credits as transfer credits then I probably wouldn't have felt that way.

The only school I applied to that required an academic reference letter was U of T. I taught swimming lessons at the pool on campus and I had a prof's kids on more then one occasion. I took her class, met with her on several occasions for school, and sat in the front row. However, I didn't get in to U of T and you don't get to see the reference letter so I can't really say whether or not that worked in my favour.

I thought I had a good supplementary app for U of T and McMaster, but I didn't get in to these places so in the end (ironically) it was my grades that got me in. I got accepted at Trent, Humber, and Western.

This is a side question, but would you mind me asking why you chose to go to Western vs Trent for your accelerated Nursing program? I'm in a similar position, finishing a biochem degree to switch to nursing next year.

This is a side question, but would you mind me asking why you chose to go to Western vs Trent for your accelerated Nursing program? I'm in a similar position, finishing a biochem degree to switch to nursing next year.

Westerns program is 19 months (Fall/Winter/Summer/Fall/Winter) while Trent's is 27 months (Fall/Winter/Summer/Fall/Winter/Summer/Fall). After already having debt from my first degree I wanted to be out working as soon as I could, and it was also two semesters less tuition and living before I have my own pay cheque. Western is also connected to 3 major teaching hospitals (and a bunch of others) so I thought the placements would be good and also my chance of getting a job after graduation. The program also seemed pretty reputable but I am learning through experience its not all its cracked up to be. Western and London are wonderful, and I am very passionate about nursing , but the program and our curriculum are a huge mess.

My top choices were actually Mac and U of T and I didn't think I had a shot at Western so I didn't even really consider it until I got accepted of the waitlist during the summer.

Can I said a suggest it if you really want to do the Laurentian one. St. Lawrence college in Brockville, Kingston and Cornwall offer the BScN in Coll. with Laurentian.

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