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MSN-DNP

Posted

Wondering from any of the CRNA's out there if there is any advantage getting jobs after graduation for a DNP compared to a MSN? I'm applying for both, but wondering if there'a any advantage besides not having to go back to school 10 years later.

Sorry. I meant to write DNAP versus the MSN for CRNA school.

wtbcrna, MSN, DNP, CRNA

Specializes in Anesthesia.

First there is no indication that you would ever have to back to school to get your DNP/DNAP. Current CRNAs are going to be grandfathered in. It is only CRNAs that graduate in 2025 or later that are going to need to have a Doctorate.

I think the DNAP/DNP will better prepare someone to utilize research to keep their individual and groups practice up to date, and it will give you the ability to teach CRNAs in the future where an MSN won't.

I know that you don't have to go back to school. Didn't mean to imply that, but many people will if they want to teach later on. Does anyone think having the DNAP vs the MSN will provide an advantage when interviewing as a new CRNA for potential jobs?

I know that you don't have to go back to school. Didn't mean to imply that, but many people will if they want to teach later on. Does anyone think having the DNAP vs the MSN will provide an advantage when interviewing as a new CRNA for potential jobs?

I understand that DNP is not mandatory now. But when you apply for a job DNP candidates will have an upper hand. Think about it why an employer will hire a MSN graduate CRNA if they have CRNA's with DNP applying for the same job.

I'm saying this because I had a hard time to find a job when I didn't have my BSN. I don't know if applies to CRNA's too.

wtbcrna, MSN, DNP, CRNA

Specializes in Anesthesia.

IMHO the DNP/DNAP is still too new in the APN community for most employers to care whether you have it or not. In an academic setting where there are SRNAs it may work in your favor if they need a doctorate prepared CRNA for clinicals or the DNP might seem like a political move against the local MDAs and you could possibly be looked down on for having your DNP.

For those entering the field with the expectation of working as a CRNA during the next 20-35 years I would recommend if you can do the doctorate as your entry to practice degree then do it now. While you might not be required to go back to school for state licensure for many years the opportunities for those lacking the higher degree will diminish over the decades as the percentage of CRNAs with the doctorate rises. Just ask the current CRNAs without a Masters Degree- there are now some states that will not grant a new license in their state to a CRNA without a graduate degree who was not licensed in that state prior to an effective date. If you can't afford to do the doctorate as entry to practice I would recommend that you plan on doing the completion clinical doctorate within 5 years of graduation- the longer you put if off the harder it is to go back.

Edited by CRNA, DNSc
incorrect word

Thank you. I thought the same thing. I don't want to have to go back to obtain another degree after this. I want to focus on my career and family. God willing I get accepted and make it through school. Once I start applying for jobs as a new graduate in South Florida, the market is going to be competitive with the number of schools down here. I figured having the DNAP definitely will not hurt my chances of getting hired.