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Mountain State University CRNA/SRNAs

Just wanted to know if any WVA Mountain State CRNAs/SRNAs are out there? I would like some info about the program. Especially the distance learning program. Thanks in advance!

I asked the same question myself a couple months ago. I received a reply from an srna at mountain state. I am fairly new to this site and do not know how to acces it easily. Maybe someone out there can tell you how to access it because she had a lot of info about the program. Good luck!!

If you want to, the date the thread was last posted was 6/21 if you would like to go back through previous threads.

crna08

Specializes in trauma, flight nurse, critical care.

I'm in the second CRNA class at MSU, called co-hort 2. The first class doesn't graduate until next year. Because this program is the only one in the country its hard to compare it to anything else, although other schools have expressed an interest and our director has provided assistance to those schools. Don't know who they are though.

My impression: there is a lot of critism that this is web based and you can't learn anesthesia on the web. Entirely correct. It is not web based. It is distance learning. The successful student is one with strong critical care skills, strong science background, is self motivated and has critical thinking skills. No one holds your hand to tell you what chapters to read. If the topic is regional anesthesia, you are expected to use your resources to learn all you can about that topic.

The director is highly respected in the field. He's on a first name basis with the authors of my anesthesia text books, he's even written some of the chapters.

The premise is you purhase a lap top (Dell) along with all the text books. This lap top is your life. No one else in my family is allowed to touch it.

Each time you come to campus, every 3 weeks, you have lab time and take your exams. The lectures are on a disc that you are provided with each time and you are tested on those subjects while on campus. Lab time is spent with Sim Man (computer generated pt with monitors, anesthesia machine etc that can give you scenerios) or learning how to provide regionals; practicing on the mannequin to insert a spinal or epidural or airway mangement. We do everything in the lab before we go into the OR. We may not be proficeint but at least if the preceptor asks us about MAC or what induction agents we want to use, we should be able to answer somewhat coherantly.

Advantage: you can still have a life, at least somewhat. If you need to take the kids to school or soccer, you can do that as long as you are able to time manage to keep up with your studies. Organizational skills and flexibilty is really key.

Another advantage: You will graduate with an MSN which means as an advance nurse degree, you are not limited to which state you practice in.

If you already have an MSN such as a practicing clinical FNP, there are those classes (thesis, Health assessment) you won't need to take.

Hope this helps.:nurse:

You will graduate with an MSN which means as an advance nurse degree, you are not limited to which state you practice in.

This is a little misleading. CRNAs who graduate from an accredited program are able to practice in any of the 50 states. It does not matter what your master's is in. About half the programs grant a nursing degree, the other half in another area.

Please visit aana.com for the most up to date information on state practice regulations.

loisane crna

crna08

Specializes in trauma, flight nurse, critical care.

This is a little misleading. CRNAs who graduate from an accredited program are able to practice in any of the 50 states. It does not matter what your master's is in. About half the programs grant a nursing degree, the other half in another area.

You are probaly right, I did neglect to clarify that I was referring to a new graduate that is just beginning their career and may want to move or travel. Most states will are very vague about out of state nurses (unless you already hold a card in that state) except TN specifies:

Out-of-State Applicants: Per the Tennessee Association of Nurse Anesthetists, the Tennessee Board of Nursing has indicated that it does not intend to grandfather out-of-state applicants who do not have master's degrees after July 1, 2005. It futher defines:

'Advanced practice nurse' means a registered nurse with a Master's degree or higher in a nursing specialty and national specialty certification as a nurse practitioner, nurse anesthetist, nurse midwife, or clinical nurse specialist." (bold face per AANA)

The following states currently specify advance practice as those with MSN degrees: Alabama, Arkansas, Hawaii, Kentucky, Louisana, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, New Hampshire, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Washington, Wyoming.

Info obtained from AANA website :State Legislative and Regulatory Requirement

[quote=ICUMindy

'Advanced practice nurse' means a registered nurse with a Master's degree or higher in a nursing specialty and national specialty certification as a nurse practitioner, nurse anesthetist, nurse midwife, or clinical nurse specialist." (bold face per AANA).....

Info obtained from AANA website :State Legislative and Regulatory Requirement

This is a common misconception, which is why I feel compelled to continue to address this until it is very clear.

"A Master's degree or higher in a nursing specialty" does not require that the degree be a MSN. There are several other degrees that will qualify.

I repeat, a current graduate of any accredited nurse anesthesia program is qualified to obtain a license and practice as a nurse anesthetist in any of the 50 states (assuming meeting certification requirements).

If the national AANA website is less than clear to those of you who need this information, I suggest you contact someone from the state association where you are interested to practice. They will have direct knowledge of how their state operates.

I live in a state which, on superficial reading, many assume requires a MSN. I can assure you that is not the case, and new graduates who hold other degrees will have no trouble working here as a CRNA.

loisane crna

I actually called West Virginia BON b/c they specified an MSN. The woman who answered my query stated that in order to be classified as an APN, you need an MSN (Master's in Nursing) but if you have an advanced degree of another type ie..Master's of Science, Nurse Anesthesia (via the School of Allied Health) this does qualify you to practice as a CRNA but not as an APN.

I'm in the second CRNA class at MSU, called co-hort 2. The first class doesn't graduate until next year. Because this program is the only one in the country its hard to compare it to anything else, although other schools have expressed an interest and our director has provided assistance to those schools. Don't know who they are though.

My impression: there is a lot of critism that this is web based and you can't learn anesthesia on the web. Entirely correct. It is not web based. It is distance learning. The successful student is one with strong critical care skills, strong science background, is self motivated and has critical thinking skills. No one holds your hand to tell you what chapters to read. If the topic is regional anesthesia, you are expected to use your resources to learn all you can about that topic.

The director is highly respected in the field. He's on a first name basis with the authors of my anesthesia text books, he's even written some of the chapters.

The premise is you purhase a lap top (Dell) along with all the text books. This lap top is your life. No one else in my family is allowed to touch it.

Each time you come to campus, every 3 weeks, you have lab time and take your exams. The lectures are on a disc that you are provided with each time and you are tested on those subjects while on campus. Lab time is spent with Sim Man (computer generated pt with monitors, anesthesia machine etc that can give you scenerios) or learning how to provide regionals; practicing on the mannequin to insert a spinal or epidural or airway mangement. We do everything in the lab before we go into the OR. We may not be proficeint but at least if the preceptor asks us about MAC or what induction agents we want to use, we should be able to answer somewhat coherantly.

Advantage: you can still have a life, at least somewhat. If you need to take the kids to school or soccer, you can do that as long as you are able to time manage to keep up with your studies. Organizational skills and flexibilty is really key.

Another advantage: You will graduate with an MSN which means as an advance nurse degree, you are not limited to which state you practice in.

If you already have an MSN such as a practicing clinical FNP, there are those classes (thesis, Health assessment) you won't need to take.

Hope this helps.:nurse:

This is great info for me since I am looking for a flexible program where I can maintain my family life as well as school commitments!! Thanks for the program info!!:clown:

Are you able to work at all- how much? Do you think d/t the limited nature of this program that it is more competitive???

crna08

Specializes in trauma, flight nurse, critical care.

Some folks still work a limited amount; 1-2 shifts a month. The teaching staff made it very clear that if the grades deterioate they will ask the student to make a choice. I personally do not work because this is now my full time job until graduation. As far as being more competitive? I do not know. I know that they accept 25-30 students and I think for the current class there were close to around 300 applicants.:specs:

Thanks- that really helps! I think a shift or two a month shouldn't interfere as long as you're investing full time in the program- 60-70/week. Probably depends on other responsibilities, though.

Although I have a strong academic record- I would be applying w/ only 2 years of ICU experience. Looks like your experience is amazing! Guess I shouldn't make plans on getting in just yet...Thanks for the reply!

ann945n, RN

Specializes in Nursing Ed, Ob/GYN, AD, LTC, Rehab.

I have been looking at this school as well though I am a longs ways off from applying. My question is how distant learning is it really? Do people fly in from out of state every three weeks or is everyone pretty much in state? I live in washington and there is only one CRNA school here 5 hours away so I thought mountain state might work if i didnt want to move but was willing to travel every few weeks.

crna08

Specializes in trauma, flight nurse, critical care.

It really is distant learning. The first class has a man that does fly in from Texas. My class has people from Michigan, TN, KY and Maryland. The advantage is not having to move in order to attend a class 5 days a week, but one has to consider what is good for them and their family. Plus, because you are not in classroom 5 days a week; your class is your home office. There has to be a lot of self discipline, organizational management and family education. The kids and spouse suddenly think you are a stay at home mom/dad and now do the things you never could before! Hah! One also needs to consider the social isolation. Because you don't go to a classroom, the only social interaction, at least for me, is the other 2 people in class that has become our own little pod. And that interaction is by phone and e-mail. Hope this helps?

ann945n, RN

Specializes in Nursing Ed, Ob/GYN, AD, LTC, Rehab.

Thank you so much ICUMindy! I think that the mountain state program would fit my life very well. We love seattle and never want to move away we have alot family and friends here so mountain state sounds like a great option since traveling doesnt bother me at all. Do you go 7 semesters straight even through the summer. Has that been had to manage with little time off? Also do they set up clinicals in your home state or do you have to do them there?

crna08

Specializes in trauma, flight nurse, critical care.

The faculty does try their best to set up cllinicals in your home town, but the hospitals in your area needs to be cooperative and crna friendly. So far in my class, only one student doesn't have a hometown clinical site and has to drive 2 hours. But that should only be temporary, hopefully.

Good luck on your quest!

ann945n, RN

Specializes in Nursing Ed, Ob/GYN, AD, LTC, Rehab.

Thank you so much ICUMindy!

yellow finch, BSN, RN

Specializes in ICU.

Thanks for all the information provided in this thread! I've been looking at Mountain State U for a while for various programs long before I became a nurse. Now that I'm in a FNP program I may look at CRNA after a few years of work.

I am going for an interview for the 2009 CRNA class at Mountain State University... Any one out there with specific program info or tips. Please send me a private message. Thanks

I am that MSU student from Texas mentioned in one of the threads. The travel was easy for me (2.5 hr direct flight from Houston, TX to Chareston, WV about $500.00 round trip). I had some classmates pick me up at the airport in Charleston for the ride to Beckley. If you cannot find a clinical site close to home you will need to move to West Virginia. I highly recommend not procrastinating on setting up a clinical site, as MSU simply will not have time to do this for you. This is a frontend loaded program with didactics first and clinical last. The clinical portion is by far the hardest part of the program and is where most who do not survive are weeded out. My class started with 28 students and we graduated 18. Keep in mind that this endeavor has a great financial risk involved (if you do not make it you could end up $200,000 or more in student loan debt). As far as surviving this program from afar, I can personally attest that it can be done. I just took boards 4 days ago so we will see how well I was prepared.

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