Master of Nursing U of M 2017 Cohort Applicants - page 5

Hello everyone! I wanted to start a post for anyone interested in the University of Minnesota's Master of Nursing program, 2017 cohort. I just submitted my application and wanted to have a space... Read More

  1. by   abrimey
    Yes, sorry that I was unclear! The admissions data is a bit old so I was curious about the admissions profiles of those who are willing to share.

    Thanks again!
  2. by   kme77
    Ok, sure.

    Prereq GPA: 4.0
    Terminal degree GPA (doctorate): 3.99
    GRE: 325, 168 V, 157 Q AWA 5.0
    Last edit by kme77 on May 19, '17
  3. by   kme77
    Ampharos, I'm not sure if you're still reading this, but if so, I was wondering if you could weigh in on the textbook bundle sold through the bookstore? I was looking at everything included, and calculated that I could buy or rent all of the books for about half the price through amazon, but I wasn't sure if there was some code or important resource that might be missing if I did things that way...any thoughts on this? Is the bundle really necessary? Thanks!
  4. by   Ampharos
    Quote from kme77
    Ampharos, I'm not sure if you're still reading this, but if so, I was wondering if you could weigh in on the textbook bundle sold through the bookstore? I was looking at everything included, and calculated that I could buy or rent all of the books for about half the price through amazon, but I wasn't sure if there was some code or important resource that might be missing if I did things that way...any thoughts on this? Is the bundle really necessary? Thanks!
    Well, I got the bundle and regretted it and I think a lot of my classmates that purchased it felt the same. I think it did come with some codes for the ebooks and a fake EHR software thing we used maybe once or twice. We also had access to ATI for some stuff, but I can't remember if it was a part of the bundle. I feel like all of the codes we needed for assignments or whatever could be purchased separately for less money rendering the bundle useless, but I can check with some people in class tomorrow to make sure I am remembering correctly.

    Also, if you are looking to save some money, I know some people in my class are preparing a document with used books and scrubs to sell. They did the same for us last year, but I had already bought my stuff and couldn't use it which was a bummer!! It might be worth waiting until your orientation before you buy anything to see if you can save some money with that!
  5. by   kme77
    Ok, thanks so much - that's really helpful. On our letter, it said the ATI will be sold separately, and I see that the SIMchart thing can also be purchased separately, so I'm pretty inclined not to buy the bundle. And thanks for letting me know about the used books, etc. - that's a good option.
  6. by   kme77
    oops - double post.
  7. by   kme77
    Hi again Ampharos - one more quick question: Do you need any of the books for the second semester? I'm thinking of renting some of them, but wondered if they would be used again... Thank you!
  8. by   Ampharos
    Quote from kme77
    Hi again Ampharos - one more quick question: Do you need any of the books for the second semester? I'm thinking of renting some of them, but wondered if they would be used again... Thank you!
    Full disclosure: I am a text book hoarder and still have all of them even though I don't really read them. If you wanted I would be happy to let you look them over to see how you feel about them.

    A lot of classes ask us to use the nursing diagnosis handbook (Ackley), so you will probably want to keep that around (I have looked at it this summer term, even, so I'm glad I still have it). The fundamentals book is pretty helpful, but a lot of the stuff you would refer to most will also be in the med-surg book, so you probably don't need to keep both forever. I think I used the assessments book (Jarvis) a few times in the spring to refresh myself on some of the assessment techniques, so you might want to have that. You could definitely rent the physiology and pharmacology books as I found those to be the least helpful (I barely used them for the classes I bought them for...). In fact, I found the pharmacology book so dense and unpleasant to read that I regretted buying it because I never used it after I attempted to read it the first week.

    TLDR: Ackley will definitely be used again, Jarvis could potentially be helpful if you want to look back on specific types of assessment skills. The fundamentals, physiology, and pharmacology are probably safe to rent.
    Last edit by Ampharos on Jul 13, '17
  9. by   kme77
    Excellent - you are so helpful!!!
  10. by   Danaika
    Hello everyone! I am sure every one excited to start school soo soon! I graduated the UMN SON a couple years ago. When I was at your place (just about to start my school) I was too excited and bought too many UMN required scrubs I still have a set of new and several almost new scrubs. I know that they are quite expensive. So if you want to save some $$ you may contact me
  11. by   MinnesotaAndy
    abrimey: Sorry I am several months late here, but if you're still interested in the application metrics, here are mine:

    Overall GPA and prerequ GPA ~3.5

    I definitely didn't have all A's and I re-took a couple of science classes, so don't be intimidated if you transcript isn't pristine!
  12. by   shebelb
    Hello all!

    I am an applicant for the 2018 cohort at the UMN! I have my interview coming up and I'm trying to learn as much about the program as possible before then! I'm pretty sure the UMN is my first choice- I've done a lot of research on the program already but I'm interested to hear about the experiences that you all have had?? Can you tell me what it's like going to class? Do you do a lot of online stuff or do you attend class every day and then do homework online? Do you like your professors and are they available to you via email or in-person? What's the hardest part of the program so far? What's the easiest?

    Thank you for any information you can give me!! I have tried to attend the info sessions but literally every single one for the past 6 months have been scheduled during my work hours!
  13. by   Ampharos
    Quote from shebelb
    Hello all!

    I am an applicant for the 2018 cohort at the UMN! I have my interview coming up and I'm trying to learn as much about the program as possible before then! I'm pretty sure the UMN is my first choice- I've done a lot of research on the program already but I'm interested to hear about the experiences that you all have had?? Can you tell me what it's like going to class? Do you do a lot of online stuff or do you attend class every day and then do homework online? Do you like your professors and are they available to you via email or in-person? What's the hardest part of the program so far? What's the easiest?

    Thank you for any information you can give me!! I have tried to attend the info sessions but literally every single one for the past 6 months have been scheduled during my work hours!
    Hey! I was a little busy with the NCLEX this week (Crushed it!!), but I wanted to pop in and offer some answers to your questions! I posted earlier about my overall feelings about the program, so I won't ramble on about that again, but the TLDR version is that I really enjoyed it! There are a few classes that are completely online (Pharm and... Maybe just pharm, actually) and some classes that are mostly online (where you meet in person like 3-4 times) and then some classes that are in person with lots of online activities. They all use Moodle (actually, I think they are switching to something else now, but for us it was moodle) extensively for posting notes and other materials, quizzes, and submitting assignments. So you have to be very comfortable with using online stuff since that is a huge part of every class. I liked most of the instructors. They were pretty approachable and helpful overall and were very responsive when emailed. Even the ones I was less comfortable with I was still able to approach with questions when necessary. I know that the cohort behind me had some instructors that are different from the ones I had, though, so they might be able to better speak to some of that.

    I guess I didn't really post anything about the last semester. The classes are pretty chill because you need to be focusing on your immersion. Most of the class assignments are group projects which takes some of the stress off since you have help. There's also the immersion seminar class where everyone presents on a patient they cared for and you have an opportunity to talk about things you are experiencing at immersion with your classmates that are in a similar area (for example, my immersion was in pediatrics so I was in the peds seminar, but there were also groups for critical care, adults, etc). As far as immersion goes, they ask you to rank your preferences in February or March (it was super early) and you find out your placement over the summer (I think we found out at the end of June). Some people got their first choice, but many (like myself) got their second, third, or even fourth choices (and there were a few people that got none of their choices). My advice for that is to not stress too much about making selections because they are going to do what they need to do to get as many people into something they expressed an interest in as possible. I really enjoyed my immersion even though I didn't get what I wanted most, so it all works out in the end.

    Overall, I didn't think the program was excessively difficult. It definitely had some stressful times, but you get through them. To me the hardest part was getting myself past some psychological hurdles as far as clinical being unlike anything I had ever experienced (I had no health care experience going into this). Honestly, they make you work hard, but it's not terrible and you will survive.

    Oh, and bonus info about the NCLEX since I just took it! First off, in October of your final semester they make you take an ATI comprehensive predictor exam. October is ridiculously early, so very few of us were actually prepared, and many of us (myself included) bombed it. Like, it told me I had a 43% chance of passing the NCLEX on my first try, which felt super crappy at the time. But the reality is I hadn't really been preparing since the NCLEX was still, like, 5 months away so I had plenty of time to prepare. So, don't let it stress you out. It's not that serious, I promise!!

    Then in November, they explain how you register for the NCLEX. You have to wait for authorization (ATT) from the board of nursing for whatever state you want to be licensed in. Most of the class tested for Minnesota and received their ATT before/around the new year. I will be moving to Wisconsin, who was slow as molasses and actually gave me weird information that was wrong and made the process take forever, so I didn't get my ATT until almost 3 weeks later. I know there were some people testing for other states, but I'm not sure how their ATT/test set up process went/is going.

    As far as preparation, the MN program offered an ATI live review that cost around $300 and was optional for us (although we heard rumors that it may become mandatory for future cohorts). I figured since our program liked ATI so much and their NCLEX pass rates are pretty good that it must be a fine option, so I did it. Less than 1/3 of my cohort attended the ATI live review, with others opting for a Kaplan review and others doing their own thing. The ATI review was in person for 3 days where an instructor comes and gives you a really brief overview of basically everything you learned in school with a focus on problem areas identified in the cohort by the ATI predictor we took and topics we requested on the first day of the class. They also explain some about the exam and how to make educated guesses which is super important since that exam is weird and you will make a lot of guesses. The review comes with a book that summarizes key content you might see on the exam and a bunch of online content you can use to help you study. There were also educational games and snacks, which was fun. The instructor was really nice and helpful.

    We had the class right before Christmas, so I started studying for real after. I never studied for more than 3-4 hours a day (because I just can't. Most says were probably more like 1-2 hours). I went through the ATI live review book to refresh myself on content and used a Saunders book as a reference since there weren't too many fine details in the ATI book. I also bought the NCLEX Mastery app and some Saunders flash cards for more questions. I did most of the extra quizzes we got by taking the ATI review, too. Doing questions was a huge part of my studying since the biggest hurdle for the NCLEX for me was trying to not freak out when I see these questions that don't seem to make sense the first time you read them. I passed the exam last week without any trouble (although if you had asked me before I found out I passed I would have told you I didn't feel great about it/probably failed, so don't expect to walk out feeling awesome).

    So, yeah. That's my feelings on the matter. I hope this was helpful!!
    Last edit by Ampharos on Jan 28

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