Latest Comments by MarcusKspn

MarcusKspn 3,973 Views

Joined: Sep 23, '02; Posts: 173 (2% Liked) ; Likes: 5

Sorted By Last Comment (Max 500)
  • 0

    Quote from Hoozdo
    Well why don't you hang abx as piggybacks with secondary tubing? Problem gone.
    This problem only happenes with patients that don't have a primary line. Thats why it takes so much to prime the piggybacks, because they have to be set up as a primary line.

  • 0

    Quote from Angie O'Plasty, RN
    With ours, there's usually enough med in the bag to cover the priming amount.

    So that if air gets into the line, it means someone's "overpriming" and the patient is not getting the required dose.

    In any case, it happens to me too. I just hang the next bag and take the air out of the closest port with a big 10 cc syringe, then run it.

    I agree it's a tad annoying to have to do that extra step, but it assures that the patient is getting all of the med.

    If we are lucky we can attach a syringe to the secondary port and backprime the IV into that. But more often than not there is a tiny little airbubble hiding somewhere in the system. Can't ever find it, but it is just enough to make the IV pump refuse to work. We use the Abbott Lifecare 5000 pumps, and they like to complain a lot.

  • 0

    I can't really wrap my head around wearing patterns. None of them seem very masculine to me.

    I do like scrubs that are single color but have a logo of some sort on the breast pocket. I have one that is Maroon and has the OU logo on it. And one time I saw a pair that had orange pants, a black top and the Harley-Davidson Logo on the pocket but I didn't have the cash with me. Now I can't find them again.

  • 0

    I volunteer for the Fire Department.

    Running EMS calls and fire calls just seem to relax me. Maybe its because we have standing orders for all our EMS patients, and I can just do what I think is right instead of paging a doctor and waiting for 10 minutes on him to call back and tell me to do what I already know needed to be done.

    That and the fact that I hang out with a lot of guys at the firehouse, it seems to balance out the fact that I work with 99% women (And I mean this in the nicest way, just got to balance out that estrogen with some testosterone).

  • 0

    I am not sure how this affects people. The school I am going to is a private school with a 2 year ADN program. The program is pretty new and has just recently got fullo approval by the Board of Nursing. They are applying to the NLNAC to get accreditation. This was a big concern when I decided to apply.

    The good thing in my case is that the school has agreements with two private 4 year schools to accept the ADN degree and use it towards a BSN despite being non NLN.

  • 0

    Thanks to everyone for all the info. I don't have any concrete plans. Like I said I grew up in Germany and speak the language and have citizenship over there. I was not thinking of moving anytime soon, but just wanted to see what my options were if I were to move for some reason down the road.

  • 0

    thanks for the German forum. I didn't think that an ADN would transfer. I do remember that Germany has huge requirements for training for anything.

  • 0

    Sorry, I realize that I have left out one small minor detail....

    I actually have German citizenship. I have lived in the United States for the last 10 years and I am going through an RN ADN program right now. I was thinking about eventually going through a BSN program. I was mainly wondering if my schooling over here would transfer to Germany.

    I have considered the military route, but there is not a base near where I originaly lived, and I was hoping to move back there for memory sake.

    Mainly I have no concrete plans at this time, but just trying to see what my options are for the future. Thanks for all the replies.

  • 0

    Hello everyone,

    I was wondering if anybody knows if your nursing license can transfer from the USA to Germany. And if so what licenses do they take?

    Do they take LPN, RN, ADN, BSN? And what is the process of transfering your license. If anybody knows any answers they are greatly appreciated.

    Thanks in advance.

    Marcus

  • 0

    I have a question for everyone. I am an LPN and was wondering how everyones nursing program taught being a patient advocate.

    In our program I remember being told that we are supposed to be an advocate for the patient. That the patient has the right to refuse treatment, can make their own decisions, etc...

    What I don't remember being taught is HOW to advocate for the patient. I don't remember being taught about conflict management, conflict resolution, how to talk to families, doctors, other staff.

    I see a lot of staff NOT advocading for the patient. I strongly doubt this is because they don't care about the paitent. I think they are not sure as to HOW to advocate.

    How was this adressed in your program. Was it taught at all, was it not. I just got accepted into the LPN-RN track and I was curius as to how and if it will be adressed.

  • 0

    I was watching the movie "In Her Shoes" with my wife the other day. When Cameron Diaz was working as a tech in the assisted living center I was once again amazed at the ability of scrubs to make every figure turn to "blah".

    I do not mean this in a sexist way, nor do I mean to put anybody down. It just reminded me of an old story I read by a man describing the myth's and truth's about being married to a nurse. One of them was the Myth of Nurses as Sex Kittens in revealing mini-skirts, white fishnet stockings, and way to small tops. He describes the reality of a nurse-outfit that consist of unisex non-form-fitting scrubs that would cause you to fail to notice if Pamela Anderson was walking by.

    Scrubs - The great equalizer of female body shapes.

  • 0

    I have two things to say regarding this situation:

    #1) Yes, in a Pre-Hospital situation an EMT is allowed to do more than an RN. Only by a hair though. An RN in a setting where he/she is not at work is limited to BLS. Airway, Breathing, Controlling Bleeding/Circulation, she cannot give any meds because there is no doctor there to supervise and give orders. Even a basic EMT can give Aspirin, Epi-Pen, Nitroglycering, Oxygen, and Charcoal. In an emergency pre-hospital setting that LPN/RN etc don't mean crap. I am an EMT/Fire Fighter with a volunteer department. When I am responding to an emergency I can only to BLS, no IV's, no Intubation, no ACLS. While it can be frustrating I know and accept my limitations. I do use my ACLS knowledge to be sure the paramedic has whatever he needs next in his hand before he can even ask for it. I can also tell you that EMT's/Paramedics have had very bad experiences with the Pediatric Office Nurse running up to the Multi-Car pileup screaming "I AM A NURSE" and have no clue what to do and not realize that unless she is prepared to do CPR there is not anything she can do in the pre-hospital setting. Same as the proctologist running up yelling "I AM A DOCTOR". It is just a completely different scope of practice.

    #2) Now, unless that EMT was WITH the ambulance or first response team that was ON DUTY he was just a bystander - first responder. He was not practicing EMT that was being covered by his Medical Director with no established Duty to Act. As such he had the exact scope of practice that a bystander - nurse had. Couldn't do anything that you couldn't do. At this point you were just two profesionals disagreeing on a course of action. You both were at the same level and do not outrank each other. If he was the EMT on duty and this was officially his patient then YES his orders would have outweight your concern, but since his name would have been on that run-report he would have been responsible for the patients aspiration pneunomia. You know how pissed we get when a family member/friend who is an EMT/Nurse/Doctor tells us how to do our job, its kind of like that.

    #3 (Yes, I reallize I said I only have 3 things to say) COMPROMISE!!!: There were two of you. How about one log rolled to clear the airway while the other held on to the head and maintained inline stabilization of the c-spine. That would be what we would do if we had to clear airway without suction in an emergency with a possible cervical injury.

    My 3 cents, have a good night everyone, and stay safe out there.

  • 0

    I don't think there should be a problem with you crossing the line. They are striking for "THEIR" contracts, "THEIR" benefits. You are not an employee for the hospital, you are not affected by their contracts, you gain no benefits if they get what they want. You work for an agency, an impartial party to the strike. Go to work, let your friends know you support them, let them know that you hope they will win and that you will take good care of their patients for them while they are fighting the man.

  • 0

    Our policy is to use CathFlo (TPA), we use a 3 way stop-cock, one end to the PICC, one end to an empty 10 cc syringe, and one end to a CathFlo syringe. Draw back on the empty syringe, creating a vacuum in the picc line between the stop-cock and the clot, switch the stop-cock to the CathFlo and the TPA is sucked up to the clot. Let sit for 30 minutes, draw the clot back into the syringe. Repeat x1 for 2 hours if not successful.

  • 0

    I was watching intervention with my wife the other day. Interesting show. What caught my eye was that when the girl on the show that was heavily addicted to heroin agreed to the intervention they had a Nurse Practitioner stay with her and help her guide her throught her detox, helping her with support and medication. Props to the show for showcasing the nurse practitioner in a very supportive position.


close