Latest Comments by YA4US4

YA4US4 860 Views

Joined: Jan 21, '06; Posts: 10 (0% Liked)

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    Please can someone advise me on a site that gives specific details on the best practice standards for setting up a wound care room-need to know how much and what should be in the room and why, as I need to put this forward in a document with references to back it up. Thanks.

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    Hi-I have a query. i was told that if a patient post op has low blood pressure, the cuff should be on the arm the patient is lying on-that way the pressure will be better-I was always taught not to do it on that arm. Plus, if the BP is low it is ok as the patient still sedated-low being about 90/50

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    Hi-I have a query. i was told that if a patient post op has low blood pressure, the cuff should be on the arm the patient is lying on-that way the pressure will be better-I was always taught not to do it on that arm. Plus, if the BP is low it is ok as patient still sedated-low being about 90/50

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    I worked in NICU for many years, but not for a few years now, so not quite up to date. However, would like to mention a few points-
    A newborn does not require a lot of fluids for the first 2 days, as their urine output is low-natural way to cope with the low fluid intake of colostrum.
    Colostrum is high in calories to maintain blood sugar unless there is an added reason for excessive or chronic low blood sugar, eg. prolonged and complicated deliveries or if the mother is diabetic.
    Colostrum is the best milk for the infants gut and is easily digested(using another mothers milk is not practiced anymore, due to risk of spreading diseases like HIV).
    Preterm babies should be be encouraged to breast feed when well and have good sucking reflexes-we used to start them breastfeeding slowly and for short periods as not to tire them and therefore cause them to loose weight-they would combine nasogastric feeding with breastfeeding, as they would suck away on the breast and still have a slow feed through the tube, and increase breastfeeding times as they got stronger. The nasogastric feed would hopefully be the mothers expressed milk.
    Full term babies that were apparently nipple confused if given supplimented feeds through bottles, in my opinion were over fed with formula, if in the first few days or were just exaused post delivery, or there was a latching problem-difficult nipples, or the baby had a slow/weak sucking reflex.
    Jaundiced would appear in some babies mostly due to excssive break down of red blood cells in the body, and seldom due to dehydration.
    If the mother is unable to feed her baby by breast to begin with, then she could try expressing colostrum onto a spoon, and spoon feed the baby. Cup feeding should only be used in chronic feeding problems, and therefore not encouraged.
    An exausted mother may need a rest now and then, and cup feeding can help then-or the odd bottle feed. If the baby is healthy and has a good sucking reflex, the odd bottle feed should not cause feeding problems, as the healthy baby would naturally know the breast milk is better (sounds crazy but nature is wonderful, and like other living and reproducing creatures, the human being is driven by natural forces), plus, the healthy baby i'm sure would not prefer a milton soaked, hard teat over the soft, pliable, warm nipple which is attatched to their favorite person, who has that gentle touch and voice they have been used to hearing for the last few months.
    It helps if mothers maintains a good diet, rests well inbetween regular breast feeds, and keeps the baby properly latched at the breast at each feed-this is encouraged if enough help is available to new mums.

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    Can someone please tell me the correct way to transfer a spinal patient from a ward bed on to a CT table.It seemed a difficult task to put a trauma board under the patient first, due to the soft mattress.

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    Hi-sorry for the misunderstanding-the registered nurses hook up from 9am to 5pm, and then the Radiologist hooks up between those hours. However, this is here in Ireland, so will then be different where you are. I hope some one else can help you there.

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    You should not have to do anything that is not in your job description-find out if you are covered legally to do this task

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    Thank you for replies-will pass this site onto my nursing friends here and back home in Africa. By the way, does any one know how I change my site name-was first thing that came to my mind then! Have a good day.:wink2:

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    I've only recently moved to Ireland from Africa. I trained in the late 70's, and have moved around alot. I have worked in most of the nursing areas, working the longest in neonatal ICUs, theatre and recovery, and before I left South Africa, I worked in trauma, which included helicopter rescue-that was the best. I came to Ireland with my three children, and because were are now a one parent family, I can't do nights any more. I requested a regular hour job, and was lucky to get these good hours in radiology. I had never done this area before, so enjoying this new field. I have been a frequent visitor to this site and find it so interesting-can keep me busy for hours, and looking forward to be an active member now.

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    I've only recently moved to Ireland from Africa. I trained in the late 70's, and have moved around alot. I have worked in most of the nursing areas, working the longest in neonatal ICUs, theatre and recovery, and before I left South Africa, I worked in trauma, which included helicopter rescue-that was the best. I came to Ireland with my three children, and because were are now a one parent family, I can't do nights any more. I requested a regular hour job, and was lucky to get these good hours in radiology. I had never done this area before, so enjoying this new field. However, I do miss trauma so much. I have been a frequent visitor to this site and find it so interesting-can keep me busy for hours, and looking forward to be an active member now.



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