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Manager interrupting

Nurses   (6,398 Views | 42 Replies)
by lifeisgood516 lifeisgood516 (New) New

457 Profile Views; 6 Posts

You are reading page 4 of Manager interrupting. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

44 Posts; 921 Profile Views

I prefer to pick my battles..that doesn't sound like one worth fighting.

You'll come up on the short end, no matter how you phrase it.

You are telling your manager that her behavior was rude...not a win win for either for a relatively trivial event!

Yes, the manager was rude..but you didn't handle it as well as you could have, to diffuse the situation.

It was up to you to turn to the MD...smile, and politely state your intent,

"Sorry, sir, can you give me 10 seconds to sign this off...xray/lab/surgery etc. needed this pt 10 min. ago?"

Now you've put the ball in his court! The decision is his..not yours..not the manager's.

If the MD is an @$$ ....or is on his way to an emergency...and insists....so be it.

Most MDs will acquiesce, refrain from flexing 'ego muscle', and accept the short wait.

My staff always knew that if a patient was in jeopardy..they should interrupt! Otherwise I put up a 'wait one' finger or lightly touch their arm to let them know I'm aware they need my attention. More often than not, if it can wait they leave a note... or return later. If I have time I find them, apologize and ask what they needed. Interruptions are the bane of nursing...always was...always will be...how you handle them makes the difference.

Edited by marylou5

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RNOTODAY has 18 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in NICU, ER, OR.

1,116 Posts; 21,278 Profile Views

Pre op safety lists come first, not to be disturbed. I'll bet my mortgage whatever doc wanted could have easily waited 2.5 minutes ****** manager

patientvsafety first and foremost

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RNOTODAY has 18 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in NICU, ER, OR.

1,116 Posts; 21,278 Profile Views

My advice: you know the right thing, but don't pursue, it's a temp gig... don't let it follow you potentially

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RNOTODAY has 18 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in NICU, ER, OR.

1,116 Posts; 21,278 Profile Views

This is a culture that has been allowed to GROW.... one RN will not change this... let it go

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32 Posts; 1,002 Profile Views

Studies are also finding that multi tasking leads to increased errors and less optimal outcomes. Personally I wouldn't want to have. Even either pt on those codes.

The pre-op is important. Do you think that anyone would excuse this nurse if as a result of the interruption something was missed and there was a negative outcome for the pt during the procedure? No, they wouldn't,they would hold her accountable.

It was wrong for the manager to interrupt, and I likely would have respectfully ask the physician to allow me to complete the checklist. Many docs are ok with that.. how can anyone fault someone for trying to maintain pt safety?

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NurseSpeedy has 18 years experience as a ADN, LPN, RN.

1,374 Posts; 18,500 Profile Views

I was inserting a foley on a patient that was NOT anatomically correct anymore when my work phone kept ringing and ringing nonstop. I was ready to throw it out the window but couldn't because I had STERILE gloves on! When I finished I was checked the caller ID, thinking it was the unit clerk suffering a case of OCD with my number. It was a patient's room. It wasn't the patient. It was the urologist who had ordered the foley on the other patient! I looked at him deadpan and said, " sorry, but I was in the middle of catching your other patient". He said, "oh, did you get it?"..."yes, but the phone ringing nonstop in my pocket looked a tad unprofessional". He then said "I just need the urology cart for this patient"...he could not have just called the desk????

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32 Posts; 1,002 Profile Views

I completely agree. It is a complete disregard for patient safety and probably an overestimation of one's ability. If someone multitasked or was not focused or distracted when doing my checklist I would feel like my care and safety were compromised.

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