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Lvn versus RN program debate??

Posted

I'm debating about whether to get a job as an Lvn versus getting my rn associates. Because I feel like it's going to take longer to go towards getting my BSN and working on those prerequisites. Generally for the rn associates there's still more prerequisites to take before applying for the program than rn program. Or should I take all the core for the rn program then apply for both? Even though I know my heart won't be that into it? I'm debating on getting my lpn then applying to the lpn to rn(BSN) program at the local four state college.

pmabraham, BSN, RN

Specializes in Hospice, Palliative Care. Has 3 years experience.

Good day, 5ummer:

When I was working on my prerequisites for a RN program, I was also sure that I completed the prerequisites for the LPN program as well (in my case, it meant taking just one more class). While I was accepted into the RN program at the college I'm attending, my plan B was (and might still be) going the LPN route, and I didn't want any delays in starting because of a missed prerequisite should plan B be necessary.

Thank you.

RunBabyRN

Specializes in L&D, infusion, urology. Has 2 years experience.

What about going straight for your BSN? The prereqs for LVN are different from RN, so you'll spend more time doing prereqs and programs, and it'll cost you more money in the end. You could do your CNA while you work toward your BSN, that way you're still doing something that will allow you to work in the field, but you won't have to spend nearly the same amount of time or money to get it.

pmabraham, BSN, RN

Specializes in Hospice, Palliative Care. Has 3 years experience.

Hi RunBabyRN:

In my case, there was only one LPN prerequisite for me to take, a basic microbiology class. I took it before the full blow microbiology class; and, in that case it helped because it better prepared me to do well in microbiology (since I was taking it alongside AP2, Nutritional Science, and Life Cycle Development, any help was appreciated).

In terms of the BSN route in my case, it was a cost issue. The closest BSN (where you don't have to be an RN already to get in) costs $30,000 per year not including books. So 4 years would run $120,000+ (as tuition only goes up every year) plus books plus gas. The community college I'm attending runs very a little over $6,000 per semester (not including books). $6K per year compared to $30K per year, at least for me, is an easy decision.

Thank you.