LPN/RN...differences??

Nurses General Nursing

Published

What are they? I am still trying to figure this one out...

Specializes in LPN, Peds, Public Health.

Largely depends on what state you are going to be working in...

Some states LPN's are nothing more than aides. Some states, like where I live, we can do most all patient care. There are a few things that we cannot do, such as spike blood, and we have to be over seen by an RN, such as having an RN as the DON, or whatever. Depends on the area you work in too.

Where I live (Oklahoma) a lot of clinic use LPN's with one RN in charge as the DON. A lot of hospitals do that too, have RN's but also LPN's.

So really maybe a call to your state BON would be helpful to tell you exactly what the difference is where you are.

Board Of Nursing?

Specializes in LPN, Peds, Public Health.

yes check with your states Board of Nursing. They can tell you.

AnnieNHRN

101 Posts

Specializes in med/surg, ER, camp nursing.

FYI, most hospital are not hiring LPNs anymore (here in the NE). If you are interested in hospital nursing choose the RN route. If you are interested in clinic, rehab, nursing home, doctors office nursing then maybe go for LPN. You can always get your RN after you get your LPN in about a year.

I work with a couple of LPNs on a med/surg floor and the only difference is they can't give IV push meds and hang blood. Our floor still has a couple LPNs but the hospital is not hiring anymore, just RNs.

Specializes in LPN, Peds, Public Health.

Thats not true everywhere though, hospitals in this area DO still hire LPNs.

WM_84

17 Posts

In my facility, there are only two difference between an LPN and RN. As an LPN, I cannot receive admissions and I need a RN co-signer on all telephone orders. Otherwise, we can do everything else which includes hanging blood, administering IV narcotics/push IV meds and participate in codes. I work in Florida where there are still a few hospitals that do hire LPN. I happen to work on a med/surg floor and ventilator unit.

Hmmm...ok..I am in the NE as well....The reason I ask in that the ADN programs in this area are very,very hard to get into. I assume that admission in the LPN program is less desirable and, as such, perhaps easier to get into. I am applying to both types of programs with an eye toward the RN degree ultimately.

Specializes in LPN, Peds, Public Health.

Either way, if you want to ultimately be an RN and cant get into the school right now, go for your LPN. Great experiences and it cuts down on your RN schooling. And you may decide you dont want to go any further, you never know. I have been an LPN for 7 years now and I wasnt going to go back, but have decided to go ahead and do it. I start school in August *yay*

With that said... I know here our LPN schools have waiting lists just as long or longer than our RN programs do.

Specializes in LTC.

LPN and RN are different levels of nursing, differentiated by the type of care we can give. LPNs, according to many boards of nursing, give "routine" care supervised to RNs and docs. RNs give a higher level of care, but in many states the edges of what each can do is somewhat blurred, also depending on the agency. LPNs tend to be the leaders of long-term care. As is true in my area, we can be limited to where we can work (hospitals tend not to hire LPNS anymore, but there are some that still do, depending on the area.) In Missouri there are few procedures that RNs can do that LPNs can't. It makes sense to contact the board of nursing where you are and ask how the scopes of practice differ.

Specializes in LTC.
Either way, if you want to ultimately be an RN and cant get into the school right now, go for your LPN. Great experiences and it cuts down on your RN schooling. And you may decide you dont want to go any further, you never know.

This is very true, in my experience. Being an LPN has afforded me a wonderful background and experience that I will take with me in my practice as an RN and has helped tremendously in RN school. I believe I am so much better prepared for practice with all that under my belt.

diane227, LPN, RN

1,941 Posts

Specializes in Management, Emergency, Psych, Med Surg.

As the RN I have to check all admissions done by the LPN, give blood, give IVP medications, and in general supervise their care. However, all the LPN's on our floor have a lot of experience and require very little supervision. They keep me up to date on everything going on with their patients (I am the charge nurse, I don't have a patient load).

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