Level of Training

Posted

I wondered if the BSN programs offer a higher level of training vs. the ADN programs? I am in the 41 and working on my last pre-req so I can apply this Fall to the program. There is a two year wait at Moorpark College from that point. Is is worth just going for my BSN?:idea:

Thank you for any input!

shock-me-sane

534 Posts

you get a bachelors degree with a BSN and an associates with an ADN. That being said, you are an RN either way. I went the BSN route precisely because of the wait list issue and community colleges. It is whatever works best for you.

good luck

meditate

28 Posts

:thankya: Thank you for your input!

Daytonite, BSN, RN

Specializes in med/surg, telemetry, IV therapy, mgmt. Has 40 years experience. 4 Articles; 14,603 Posts

In a BSN program you are required to take more classes by the very nature of being in a bachelors program and that is required in order to fulfill the requirements for the degree. My BSN program in addition to making sure we had basic RN training also focused more on communication and leadership skills. It also focused on case management. This was not done in my ADN program quite possibly because there just wasn't enough time. Reseach and writing was also a much bigger focus than in the ADN program and this is very typical of BSN programs.

Irina2009

20 Posts

I don't know what area you live in. But alot of 2 yr colleges have long waiting lists that you could be on for 2 years before you get it and you have to apply 1 year in advanse.

I am in my junior year of a BSN program its alot more expensive buy worth it. I spent two years at a community college and finished all 70 credits. I was only able to do that by taking summer classes and over christmas brake. At the University they have no waiting lists as soon as your in your in and in two years I graduate.

It would have taken me exactly four years at a community college because I would have had to apply by Dec 06 to get in Sep 07 and I would have the in between time to do nothing since I would have already completed their pre-reqs which is only 30 credits. So I took extra classes and made it.

Keep in mind that a BSN program is douple the pre-reqs and double the nursing credits. Some Universities like LaSalle have a part time evening and weekend program.

Hope it helps.

KimblyRN

Specializes in NICU. 15 Posts

Would someone be so kind as to explain the ADN to me a bit more? Is this the most common route the become an RN in the US? We only have one option in Canada now which is a BSN so we get to take it or leave it.

Thanks!

Daytonite, BSN, RN

Specializes in med/surg, telemetry, IV therapy, mgmt. Has 40 years experience. 4 Articles; 14,603 Posts

Would someone be so kind as to explain the ADN to me a bit more? Is this the most common route the become an RN in the US? We only have one option in Canada now which is a BSN so we get to take it or leave it.

Thanks!

ADN stands for Associate Degree in Nursing. It is obtained through a two-year community college program. You still learn the basic RN curriculum that a BSN learns. The only difference is the kind of school it is being taught in and the collegiate degree you end up with when you are finished. RN training is still RN training here in the U.S. whether a person goes to a community college (gets an ADN), a university (gets a BSN), or goes to a hospital based program (gets a diploma). Each state has a board of nursing that regulates the required curriculum in order for someone to go to the nursing school and then take the exam to become licensed as an RN.

ADN is a common route to become an RN here in the U.S. for the very simple reason that there are more community colleges than there are universities.

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