Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer biases in Obstetric Nursing curricula

Posted
by chiandre chiandre Member Educator Nurse

Specializes in EDUCATION;HOMECARE;MATERNAL-CHILD; PSYCH. Has 25 years experience.

You are reading page 2 of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer biases in Obstetric Nursing curricula. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

JaneyW

JaneyW

Specializes in Perinatal, Education. Has 9 years experience. 640 Posts

I agree that this needs to be addressed and encourage you in your research. I have to say, though, that I don't agree that it is always a matter of education. A nurse's religion may make it impossible for them to see this population in any other terms than those you quoted in your original post. Where the education needs to be is in reminding nurses to leave their personal biases at the door when providing caring and competent patient care.

I am slightly perturbed by these comments. Upon what data are you basing your assumption that "religious" nurses might not be able to care for any class of patient? Do you have evidence for this? Or is this a bias of yours? Which religion is hazardous to nurses' thought processes? Is it all religions?

Based upon what I read, I have to wonder if it is possible for Janey to give compassionate care to conservative Christian (or Muslim, or Orthodox Jewish) patients? Would she try to be open minded about interacting with them, tolerating their perspectives, understanding a bit about their doctrines, listening to them when they preface their health behaviors on some scripture passage and on and on and on. And if I were Janey's colleague, could I be sure that she would tolerate me if I were "out of the closet" with my religious beliefs (assuming I am performing on a professional level)? Does Janey have a repertoire of therapeutic responses to patients who view the world as sinful and in need of redemption? How many nurses think deeply about patients' spiritual needs. Do they have a good working relationship with their hospital chaplains or even know how to contact them when needed?

And... I wonder when a doctoral student will research and write a dissertation on non-constructive biases toward conservative/Orthodox religious nursing students and practicing nurses?

Forgive me, I didn't mean to hijack the discussion. But if you are interested in tolerance, you need to think broadly. I endorse the OP and her research and think it could be an excellent contribution to our EBP. But be careful... you can't measure your multicultural credentials by how much you reject one (formerly dominant) culture over another.

Wow! Thanks for the personal attack! I was basing my answer on the nurses quoted in the OP's post and not out of some deep personal bias against people of any particular religion. And to answer all of your questions about my ability to give compassionate care: Yes, yes and yes! I also teach my students with the same level of care regardless of their personal or spiritual beliefs. If you had read my post carefully, I was saying exactly what you are advocating. We are not out to use education to change people's beliefs, we need to help nurses to care for all the same regardless of those beliefs. I'm sorry I kicked your hornets nest, but please try to take a pause and breathe before you attack me.

JaneyW

JaneyW

Specializes in Perinatal, Education. Has 9 years experience. 640 Posts

jmq, I think you misread Janey's posting. She didn't say it wouldn't be possible for someone to give compassionate care. She said it might be impossible for someone to know another person's lifestyle/culture without feeling bias toward him or her. Feeling a bias doesn't mean one acts on it. Everyone has biases. It's good to recognize them so we don't let them lead us to do something inappropriate.

Exactly--thank you!

JaneyW

JaneyW

Specializes in Perinatal, Education. Has 9 years experience. 640 Posts

My original thought process in reaction to the OP was that I disagreed with the idea that education is the answer. That may not have been what the OP was saying, but what I thought was that it came down to educating about the LGBT communityand nurses would all understand and accept. Being tolerant and being able to care for someone without showing your biases is very different from accepting an LGBT patient and their lifestyle. I live in California and we just had a proposition voted in making it illegal for gay people to get married. So, even after all the education we have had about LGBT people, they are not accepted by most--even here. And you better believe that churches were the main ones behind it. If you believe it is wrong, education won't change that. However, it may help nurses to care for this community with the compassion and feeling they deserve. I hope that helps clear this up. I never said anything about religious nurses not being able to care for others with compassion.

VickyRN, MSN, DNP, RN

Specializes in Gerontological, cardiac, med-surg, peds. Has 16 years experience. 105 Articles; 5,349 Posts

Moderator's friendly reminder: Colleagues, please debate the content without resorting to any semblance of personal attack. If you feel that another person has singled you out for an attack, please use the report feature (little red triangle) at bottom left. Thank you and carry on. Interesting discussion :)

SnowShoeRN

SnowShoeRN

Specializes in Family Medicine, Tele/Cardiac, Camp. Has 10 years experience. 468 Posts

I would love to see this study. Please let us know about your progress. I don't work in OB or L+D and never have. But I certainly saw homophobia on my med-surg units both to patients and to other GLBT staff.

My OBGYN is wonderful. She knows that I'm bisexual and I'm completely and 100% comfortable in discussing my medical needs with her. When the time comes for me to have a family (whether or not it's with a man, woman, or by my lonesome) I know she will continue to be professional and supportive.

My old PCP, on the other hand, used to say "That doesn't count" when I'd mention my sexual orientation. And not in an accepting way. In a dismissive and clueless and dangerous way. As if GLBT people are not also at risk of STD's or domestic violence. As if some don't have unique health concerns.

And don't even get me started on the time I was in the hospital for my appendectomy. In short, I was having just the nicest conversation with my nurse and aid when the phone rang. And it was my partner who was unable to be with me at that time due to travel. And as staff listened to me speak to her while they tidied my room and walked the roommate to the bathroom, I watched their faces turn to stone. After that they were curt and perfunctory. No more smiles, no more joking. They couldn't get out of the room fast enough.

I think this is a very important study for many many reasons.