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Just a rant

Posted

Specializes in School, FNP. Has 6 years experience.

So, as I was walking out the door this morning, my daughter tells me her throat is really sore, so I take a look, red, swollen, white spots. She had strep several weeks ago and did the 10 days of antibiotics, so I told her to put on a movie (she is in 5th grade almost 11) I would go to work, call and get a sub, come home and take her to the Dr. Thought all this could be accomplished in less than 2 hours. Well, not a sub to be found so I couldn't leave. Thankfully my husband was able to reschedule some meetings and take over (this is the third time this school year he has had to). Look, my husband is the breadwinner of the family, I went into school nursing in part so I could be more available to my family and I am so upset. I am the one who should be there to take care of the kids. I loved my last school nursing job(in a different state) and thought that I had found my niche, but am not enjoying this one, I am always busy (I see 40-70 kids per day), have several procedures, and no support and never have time for my paperwork or filing. I take my files homw to enter them. My health office is nowhere near the front office, so I don't even have anyone to cover if I need to use the restroom or any adult conversation during the day. I really am hating it and turning into the biggest whiner. Any suggestions?

geocachingRN

Specializes in Community & Mental Health, Sp Ed nursing. Has 3 years experience.

Other than checking out neighboring schools to see what else might be available, nope nada. :-) I have 5 schools and 3 days to work them as my district can't seem to pay me full-time.

SchoolNurseBSN

Specializes in school nursing. Has 4 years experience.

I also feel your frustration. The nurses in my district are treated like poo! Let's dump everything that nobody else wants to do on you and no you are subhuman and do not deserve a lunch or bathroom break. Sad thing is, we are so valuable and the schools we cover really do not know how lucky they truly are. In many parts of the country, teachers and front office staff handle everything because there are no nurses in the budget!

A few people at your school need to be trained to handle things in your absence. You are not a robot!

NYnursejo

Specializes in community, home health, ob-gyn, school. Has 12 years experience.

I agree with all the previous posters, You can definately scout out surrounding schools but I think that this is the nature of the beast with this specialty, Your autonomous, lonely, overworked and go unrecognized. Don't get me wrong, I enjoy what I am doing but sometimes feel bored, and bitter when Im at the office late, I just look foward to those long holiday weeks and our summers, you really would'nt have that opportunity with your children if you worked anywhere else...but I do understand when your child is sick you wanna be there for them. We also have slim pickings on our sub list.

kidsnurse1969

Specializes in Coronary Care, School Nurse. Has 15 years experience.

Do what the teachers do when they have a sick child: Call in from home and let someone else find a sub and worry about the rest of the kids. You have to take care of your own!

nightie-night nurse

Specializes in School Nursing, Critical Care. Has 6 years experience.

I too have had the trouble with finding a sub. My supervisor has had me call my sub while I had a 102 degree fever and was vomiting. I called in between bathroom breaks. I had to go in for half a day that time while wearing a mask. I don't think we have the ability to just call from home and let someone else deal with it. It always comes back to us.

I am sorry that this has happened to you and I truly hope it gets better.:hug:

SchoolNurseBSN

Specializes in school nursing. Has 4 years experience.

I too have had the trouble with finding a sub. My supervisor has had me call my sub while I had a 102 degree fever and was vomiting. I called in between bathroom breaks. I had to go in for half a day that time while wearing a mask. I don't think we have the ability to just call from home and let someone else deal with it. It always comes back to us.

I am sorry that this has happened to you and I truly hope it gets better.:hug:

How can we telll our students and staff to stay home when running a fever when we are expected to show up in any condition?

luvapug

Has 9 years experience.

I worked at a school like this once and it used to be like that in our school system, however I'm happy to say it's better now . Nothing will change, however, if you continue to show up even when you or your child is sick because everything is still covered on their end. When this happens do not show up-if it throws them in a bind often enough they will find another solution. As nurses, we are exposed over and over to illnesses so we are going to occasionally get sick and to think it will never happen is unrealistic. Also,you need to get the administration involved. Go to your principal and state you need a lunch break or paid overtime and if the problem isn't resolved you will move on up to the superintendent. I guarantee you'll get your lunch break. Besides, it's not fair and it's not healthy for you not to get one period! But be nice about it first. Yes, you are probably salary but there are laws in place for this sort of thing and they won't want the bad publicity. I've had prinicpals that didn't even realize I wasn't getting a chance to eat all day. At our district we are now allowed to train other personnel to adminster meds, what to do in emergency situations like epi-pens, glucagon, etc so maybe check into that so you can go eat lunch in peace. If they aren't willing then you need to ask them what they plan to do the next time you are sick and there is not sub. It's also a good idea to plan your lunch when you don't have any regular meds or treatments coming in. Also let the staff know that for this half hour each day is your lunch and no children will be seen by you and if it's an emergency go to the main office. The main office may only call you if they think it's bad enough to call 911 or a student needs an emergency inhaler or something like that. (You also have to put your foot down if they do call you and you will have to tell them a possible sprained ankle is not an emergency and you will check this student in however many minutes when your lunch is over or whatever.) Secondly, the last hour of the day I always informed my staff was my "planning period" where even though I didn't plan for class, I needed this time to get caught up on all my paperwork, dr's orders, filing, charting, etc. and that any kid that has made it all day does not need to see the nurse unless it's an emergency, injury, or active vomiting-that sort of thing. This would cut down majorly on the kids that came in so try that. The school system will walk all over you if you let it so stand your ground and demand your rights. Good luck!