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IV calculations HELP!

Posted

Just a few questions need help with, appreciate anything. Very unsure on these two. Here's how we were taught to typically set IV problems up:

Amnt of solution/hours to administer= mL/hr

If with drop factor (gtt/min)

Amount of solution x gtt divided by

mins/hr

1.)An IV bag has 350 mL remaining. It is infusing at 35 gtt/min with tubing 15 gtt/mL being used. How long will it take to finish?

2.)1000mL NS to infuse at 90mL/hr. Find drip rate for 15 mL tubing

Thank you!!

NICU Guy, BSN, RN

Specializes in NICU. Has 6 years experience.

Show your work on the two problems and others will guide you to the correct answers. We are not going to do your homework for you without some effort on your part.

There's no work to show if I didn't know what I was doing. I didn't post my entire 30 question homework did I? I was clearly asking for direction. I supplied how we were taught to set up the equations and as anyone could see, they are much different.

mrsboots87

Specializes in Neuro, Telemetry. Has 6 years experience.

There's no work to show if I didn't know what I was doing. I didn't post my entire 30 question homework did I? I was clearly asking for direction. I supplied how we were taught to set up the equations and as anyone could see, they are much different.

Defensive much? Don1984 was just asking you to ATTEMPT at setting up the equation and then would offer assistance from there. In math class, the equations are given, then a couple practice set ups demonstrated, then you are given problems. If you were to ask a math teacher for help, they would first ask you to try to set it up and then guide you from there. That is how the teaching/learning process works best. Just take a stab at it. No one here will judge your for incorrect set up. But they can help you see what you are doing wrong/right.

Also, side note: for #2, pretty sure that question is worded incorrectly. Tubing is not rated in mL, but rather by drop factor/gtt. I'm guessing it is supposed to say "15gtt tubing" or "drop factor 15" and in that case, the numbers should be very easy to plug into your second equation you listed. As far as if the equations are correct is beyond me as I use and love dimensional analysis for med math. GL

13grad71

Specializes in Emergency, Tele, Med Surg, DOU, ICU.

1.)An IV bag has 350 mL remaining. It is infusing at 35 gtt/min with tubing 15 gtt/mL being used. How long will it take to finish?

What you want to do is figure out ml/hr.

ml/15 gtt x 35 gtt/min x 60 min/hr = 140 ml/hr then 350ml/140 ml hr = 2.5

pmabraham, BSN, RN

Specializes in Hospice, Palliative Care. Has 3 years experience.

Good day, nerdyjulia87:

May I suggest two sites which are very helpful for dosage calculations?

1. DosageHelp.com - Helping Nursing Students Learn Dosage Calculations

2.

for learning dimensional analysis.

While there are three (that I know of) methods for doing dosage calculations, dimensional analysis typically provides the highest degree of accuracy as there are no pre-conversions in order to do the formula (everything is built in).

Thank you.