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Is OR a good starting place for Graduate RNs?

Texas   (1,284 Views 4 Comments)
by cookieez cookieez (New) New

625 Profile Views; 13 Posts

I am a graduating nurse and have applied to a lot of hospitals but unfortunately have not had any offers. Time is basically running out for me now because a lot of hospitals have gotten their new grad positions filled. If I don't get anything now, I will have to wait until the next cohort graduates for new opportunities and I don't want to wait that long.

I've applied for an OR position which will be contacting me before the other 2 med surg positions at two other hospitals. I'm not surd if I should accept the OR's offer or risk it and hope the other two hospitals will also offer me.

I don't want to do OR as a graduate nurse because I don't want to lose my skills and have so little patient interaction. It's expensive hiring grads so I can't leave until a few years. I just don't want to be stuck in a position I don't like for that long but then again, I desperately need a job. I want to be an NP one day but I dont think I can do that as an OR nurse. Also is it easy to transfer to other floors if all you have is OR experience?

Can someone either talk me into working in the OR or out of it? Is there any opportunities for growth?

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Rose_Queen is a BSN, MSN, RN and specializes in OR, education.

4 Followers; 4 Articles; 8,909 Posts; 104,586 Profile Views

If the OR doesn't interest you, don't do it. It takes a long time to train a new OR nurse, and to see one decide that it is not for them after putting in a lot of effort training them takes a toll on the morale of those who enjoy working in the OR.

Yes, OR nurses can go on to be NPs without other experience. I've personally worked with several in the last couple of years who did so.

I've worked with many OR nurses who have gone on to have successful careers in ICU, med/surg, home health, hospice, so on and so forth. The ability to change specialties depends much more on the personality of the nurse and the supportiveness of the new environment.

You may lose some of your skills you're learning in nursing school, but you will learn others. Patient interaction may be brief, but it is a skill to be able to get a patient and his/her family members to trust you to be their advocate when they are at their most vulnerable.

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13 Posts; 625 Profile Views

Thank you so much for your response. This has given me a better perspective on the situation.

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108 Posts; 4,056 Profile Views

My first RN job after graduation was in operating room working as a scrub and circulating nurse. I also did not know what to think about it, but I really enjoyed the role in the OR (except the attitudes from surgeons). I was in a great teaching hospital and with a great team, and I learned many useful skills. I think I would still be there, if the surgeons would really learn to appreciate the nurses. I was able to switch departments within the same hospital, since I was interested to learn more about my patients and see actual progress in recovery.

I am glad I did not turn OR position down. I gained great experience and eventually was able to progress to the department where I can be at my best.

Good luck with your decision.

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