Is nursing right for me?

Posted
by Milky7126 Milky7126 (New) New Nurse

Specializes in Med Surg.

I’m a new grad nurse working on my own for under 2 months at med surg/tele unit. This really isn’t a bad unit compared to what others go through. We’re usually fully staffed to have 5 patients. My coworkers are helpful. On top of that I’m night shift. 
 

Yet I am so so stressed out about work. I have improved with charting speed, protocols, and when I’m made aware of mistakes I really do try to learn from them. I definitely have improved but I don’t think I’m at the level where I’m supposed to be. And I also think I’m being hard on myself but it’s hard to not compare myself to the other new grads who leave shortly after shift change. 
 

I wouldn’t consider myself an anxious person but I have never cried so much. I dread going into work. I’m not used to night shift and already have trouble sleeping during the day but on top of that I have dreams about work and messing up at work. My tolerance for getting overwhelmed is getting smaller. 
 

I have a 4 year contract with this hospital and 1 year of commitment before transferring units. I really want to stick with this for at least 6 months but I feel like this job is leeching into my personal life way too much. 
 

I would appreciate advice. Or even words of encouragement. I feel like the biggest baby ever but I don’t know how else to get help without owning up to how I really feel. 

caffeinatednurse, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-surg, telemetry, oncology, rehab, LTC, ALF. Has 6 years experience. 311 Posts

Every new grad nurse feels this way at one time or another. I felt this way for a very long time, as well. You start feel like you’re investing too much of yourself with little return for your efforts. You think that how you’re feeling is unique and everyone else is doing so much better than you.

You are and they’re not. They’re just handling things differently. It takes at least a year to feel more comfortable in your role as a nurse. You’re being asked to do things you’ve never done before and you’re being challenged constantly. The only way to get better at something is to keep trying. You’ll keep making mistakes and that’s OK, as long as it’s not the same mistake over and over again. Eventually, you’ll build a bank of knowledge and other people will come to you with their questions. But you’re not there yet, and you shouldn’t expect yourself to be. You’re going to feel wildly uncomfortable for a while before you find your style of nursing and figure out how to navigate your unit. The fact that you’re self-aware enough to recognize your own mistakes means that you’re still trying your hardest. Keep up the good work.

Jeff Keeth

Jeff Keeth, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in Administration. Has 46 years experience. 7 Posts

If I'm reading this correctly, the pt population is never above 5 which means you probably have 2 patients. So, no, I don't understand your problem.

Milky7126

Milky7126

Specializes in Med Surg. 4 Posts

On 10/4/2022 at 10:51 AM, caffeinatednurse said:

Every new grad nurse feels this way at one time or another. I felt this way for a very long time, as well. You start feel like you’re investing too much of yourself with little return for your efforts. You think that how you’re feeling is unique and everyone else is doing so much better than you.

You are and they’re not. They’re just handling things differently. It takes at least a year to feel more comfortable in your role as a nurse. You’re being asked to do things you’ve never done before and you’re being challenged constantly. The only way to get better at something is to keep trying. You’ll keep making mistakes and that’s OK, as long as it’s not the same mistake over and over again. Eventually, you’ll build a bank of knowledge and other people will come to you with their questions. But you’re not there yet, and you shouldn’t expect yourself to be. You’re going to feel wildly uncomfortable for a while before you find your style of nursing and figure out how to navigate your unit. The fact that you’re self-aware enough to recognize your own mistakes means that you’re still trying your hardest. Keep up the good work.

Thank you. I also forget I was a covid baby and got barely any clinicals. I forget how far I’ve come and how much I’ve learned on the job. I think it’s funny that when I first started I was so nervous about my first insulin administration, haha. I know I have so much to learn still but I also have my own mini accomplishments. 
I haven’t figured out my style of nursing & it can be frustrating to try a certain order & then have to change it but I know it’ll be worth it once I find my rumble. 
I appreciate your support. Rarely anyone outside the field seems to understand and I was having trouble separating work & personal life. I’m doing a lot better mentally & I figured out a sleep schedule that works for me. 
<3 much love to you

Milky7126

Milky7126

Specializes in Med Surg. 4 Posts

On 10/10/2022 at 6:32 PM, Jeff Keeth said:

If I'm reading this correctly, the pt population is never above 5 which means you probably have 2 patients. So, no, I don't understand your problem.

There is a misunderstanding, haha