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Is ER for New Nurses?

Emergency   (1,513 Views 10 Comments)
by Jaymaa Jaymaa (New Member) New Member

721 Profile Views; 7 Posts

Hello! Every one this is my first time to post. I am a new nurse graduateed in last Jan. I starded my first nursing job in County hospital in Pediatric (1 day to to 21 years). I went through 3 month internship programme. But I am still sufferring a lot. I am scared to work in trauma room even with other nurse. It is too much. and I think in ER we dont have any nurse patient interaction. Patients comes and go. No time to learn any diseases process. Every thing in hurry hurry..... I think I am at the wrong place. Is there any advice for which floor to start for a 4 month old nurse. I am working in a teaching hospital. I have to work with resident doctors also. So I have to check my med orders three times but on the other hand every one wants everything in moment in ER. Please Please Have some direction. I have never work before in any medical field.

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FUNNYGIRLRN specializes in ER, Psych.

29 Posts; 981 Profile Views

I started in the ER in jan as a new grad too. I am suffering with the exact same problems. I don't have any good advice becuase i myself am suffering through day to day until i can figure something out. I just thought it would be nice to let you know that you aren't alone out there. Good Luck.

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traumaRUs has 27 years experience as a MSN, APRN and specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU.

15 Followers; 155 Articles; 20,878 Posts; 188,471 Profile Views

I worked in a level one ER for 10 years. We did hire new grads and they had 4 months of orientation. Do you like it? If you like it, but just don't feel comfortable, how about asking for more time? If you don't like it, however, then I would try to go to a general floor where you could have pts for a little bit longer time and also where you could learn at a little bit slower pace. Good luck.

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1,343 Posts; 5,653 Profile Views

Congratulations!

It sounds like you need to transfer to a floor where you will have inpatients, patients and their families that you can get to know for a few days. A longer-term setting, like a burn unit, would also probably be good. Just explain that to your supervisor. She will understand. She might not like to lose you and might advise you to stay for at least a year in ER so you can really get the hang of it. But if you are unbearably unhappy, maybe you should make the change. Then again, don't get into the habits of job-hopping and of throwing in the towel.

I know it's hard. I wish you well.

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1 Post; 494 Profile Views

hello, don't worry about it because that's normal and in the long run you will get used to it. Actually, I suffered the same situation that you experiencing right now and believe me it's more worst in a government hospital ER. The good thing is you are boosting your professional growth and self esteem.

by the way, if it's only possible, can I have all the list of your ER equipments and materials (new born up to geriatric) that you are using in your ER, because I was appointed to reset-up our ER so I need to compare if it will work to our ER. thank you in advance.

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Jennifer, RN has 11 years experience and specializes in ER, telemetry.

226 Posts; 4,470 Profile Views

It boils down to whether you like it or not. You can still be scared and still like it, but if you don't like the fast pace or not interacting with pts, then the ER is not the best place for you. I personally like the pace and the treat and street them philosophy. I enjoy the diversity of the ER. Trauma scares everyone at first, until you have actually immersed yourself in a few and worked them, whether with another nurse or not. TNCC helps too. Are you ACLS and PALS certified? If not, those classes are essential, in my opinion, in feeling comfortable with taking care of critically ill pts. I had 4 years experience on a tele floor, and am thankful I didn't go right into ER nursing out of grad school. I learned a lot on the floor about, like you said, disease processes and medications and had a good baseline knowledge coming into the ER.

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7 Posts; 721 Profile Views

hello, don't worry about it because that's normal and in the long run you will get used to it. Actually, I suffered the same situation that you experiencing right now and believe me it's more worst in a government hospital ER. The good thing is you are boosting your professional growth and self esteem.

by the way, if it's only possible, can I have all the list of your ER equipments and materials (new born up to geriatric) that you are using in your ER, because I was appointed to reset-up our ER so I need to compare if it will work to our ER. thank you in advance.

Thank you so much for your reply. I am not in the first level trauma. Our ER room is very simple. Yes we have all the code Blue equipment. And continuos monitering system. ans if it is a first grad seriousness then we transfferred to our no 1 trauma fecility. This is my first time to post so I dont know I shoud give you my personal Email or not. our hospital is www.hchd.com I hope this will work.

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7 Posts; 721 Profile Views

Thank you all of you who have responned to my post. I will try to change dept. Might be on the floor telemetry. All of yours suggessions and encouragement are very help to me in my new carrier.

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7 Posts; 721 Profile Views

Personally thank you so much. I have not done anything like PALS, ACLS... I will do that next month. first PALS and then others. I definately go for tele floor for a while and I think that will help. But we are really short in staff so little hesitate to ask for transfer. But I think I have to request now. I am not favouring job change. But we have many locations of clinics and two big university hospital under same county department. we are toatl of six thousands employees all togateher. Again thanks.

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Victoriakem has 15 years experience and specializes in 6 years of ER fun, med/surg, blah, blah.

248 Posts; 3,342 Profile Views

Personally, most new nurses should start out on the floor, where they have more time to learn disease processes, interact with pts & their families & really learn how to access someone, instead of jump starting into the ED. There is so much to take in as a new nurse. However, there are a few who really do well, but most take 6 months to get settled & in my hospital they start out on the Urgent care side & not Acute care. I come from a Med/Surg background for 7 years & started out on Acute, or as I call it the Heart Attack side, & it really take 2 yrs to feel comfortable in the ED, even with previous nursing experience. Why not go to the floors, Med/surg etc for a year & then come back to the ED? It could really help you.:nuke:

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