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insulin and heprin antidotes

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Can anyone please tell me where I can find out about Insulin antidotes and where & why my professor's answer is D10 & D50? Also the antidote for heparin sodium, and the antidote for Morphine Sulfate (Ms Contin)?

loveofrn, BSN, RN

Specializes in MICU. Has 3 years experience.

we do not assignment for students without them trying to use google or their textbook to find the answers.

loveofrn, BSN, RN

Specializes in MICU. Has 3 years experience.

do you mean magnesium sulfate?

ButterflyRN90

Specializes in Renal and Telemetry. Has 5 years experience.

Can anyone please tell me where I can find out about Insulin antidotes and where & why my professor's answer is D10 & D50? Also the antidote for heparin sodium, and the antidote for Morphine Sulfate (Ms Contin)?

To find the answer, figure out what D10 and D50 are. Also, you must know what insulin is and does. Once you find that out,you'll be able to answer. :)

wtbcrna, MSN, DNP, CRNA

Specializes in Anesthesia.

Try looking up "treatment for overdose of X" instead of antidote for these drugs which isn't the right terminology.

Hi, yes I know what insulin is and does, so is my professor saying you would use D10 & D50 as an insulin antidote, which is really insulin overdose not really "antidote", so what I read according to drug guide it say use dextrose 10%-25% for acute hypoglycemia, and Dextrose 50% when its insulin induced hypoglycemia. is this correct? or am I still on the wrong track?

Esme12, ASN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care, ED, Cath lab, CTPAC,Trauma. Has 41 years experience.

Hi, yes I know what insulin is and does, so is my professor saying you would use D10 & D50 as an insulin antidote, which is really insulin overdose not really "antidote", so what I read according to drug guide it say use dextrose 10%-25% for acute hypoglycemia, and Dextrose 50% when its insulin induced hypoglycemia. is this correct? or am I still on the wrong track?
You are correct. There isn't a real "reversal" agent for insulin. It is the treatment for hypoglycemia that is caused by the insulin.

Morphine and heparin however do have reversal agents. What has your drug guide revealed to you?

Thank you and yes I understand it is a "treatment" like you said after I finally started researching in my drug guide and decided to look up dextrose in the drug guide not "insulin" like my professor had on the sheet and that's what my drug guide had said about D10 & D50. About Morphine, from what I got from my drug guide would it be naloxone? I have not had a chance to look up heparin sodium yet.

Esme12, ASN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care, ED, Cath lab, CTPAC,Trauma. Has 41 years experience.

Naloxone is right or Narcan. It is an opiate agonist and will reverse most opiate based narcotics.

wtbcrna, MSN, DNP, CRNA

Specializes in Anesthesia.

Naloxone is right or Narcan. It is an opiate agonist and will reverse most opiate based narcotics.

Narcan/naloxone is an opioid antagonist. Which I know that is what you meant to put. I am just clarifying it for the students.

oh sorry yes that is what I meant. Thank you

Can anyone please tell me where I can find out about Insulin antidotes and where & why my professor's answer is D10 & D50? Also the antidote for heparin sodium, and the antidote for Morphine Sulfate (Ms Contin)?

You need to open your textbook. This is far too easy. It's not even conceptual, it's factual. Goodness, this could be Googled. I don't understand the laziness in some nursing students that come to this forum thinking they'll get straight answers without any input from themselves.

I did open ALL my books both books the professor had us buy, my drug guide and my manual of nursing practice. Our professor's in the previous semester did not cover those solutions therefore we never went over them nor where we would find it to read about those solutions, however after READING TEXTBOOK AFTER TEXTBOOK I finally found it under dextrose in the drug guide. I wasn't being lazy about it AT ALL maybe our professor should have been more clear instead of just writing Insulin Antidote_________. just like that and no where will you find insulin antidote in those words unless we do not have a book that says that. And yes I know the other ones too its just they sheet of paper she emailed us that I think confused us all.

Also if you read my comment I asked if anyone could tell me where I could find the information, what topic would I find it under because they didn't just have that under the diabetes chapter it talked about insulin and all the other problems that go along with diabetes but not the specific antidote my professor said D10 & D50 and no I don't google for my nursing answers I like to read everything I can about that topic in a book or a reputable site that I can back up my answers on why I am going to give that patient that particular treatment. I would never want someone to just give me an answer, you always have to have a rationale behind your answer which comes from reading. I like to get input on other resources people have used that some of us aren't aware of to increase our nursing knowledge

wtbcrna, MSN, DNP, CRNA

Specializes in Anesthesia.

It is often easier and much faster to initially google the question/answer and then go to your text books for more detailed information.

Textbooks are fine, but the latest information is out of date before those textbooks are ever published.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antidote

If you click on the definition for antidote this is probably why you were initially having so much trouble finding the answers.

Edited by wtbcrna

Esme12, ASN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care, ED, Cath lab, CTPAC,Trauma. Has 41 years experience.

Narcan/naloxone is an opioid antagonist. Which I know that is what you meant to put. I am just clarifying it for the students.

LOL....but addicts that you give it to finds it puts them in agony....LOL I have been so sick....thanks wtbcrna

Esme12, ASN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care, ED, Cath lab, CTPAC,Trauma. Has 41 years experience.

Also if you read my comment I asked if anyone could tell me where I could find the information, what topic would I find it under because they didn't just have that under the diabetes chapter it talked about insulin and all the other problems that go along with diabetes but not the specific antidote my professor said D10 & D50 and no I don't google for my nursing answers I like to read everything I can about that topic in a book or a reputable site that I can back up my answers on why I am going to give that patient that particular treatment. I would never want someone to just give me an answer, you always have to have a rationale behind your answer which comes from reading. I like to get input on other resources people have used that some of us aren't aware of to increase our nursing knowledge

Here is an excellent online IV med resource....Clinicians ultimate guide to drug therapy

Also if you read my comment I asked if anyone could tell me where I could find the information, what topic would I find it under because they didn't just have that under the diabetes chapter it talked about insulin and all the other problems that go along with diabetes but not the specific antidote my professor said D10 & D50 and no I don't google for my nursing answers I like to read everything I can about that topic in a book or a reputable site that I can back up my answers on why I am going to give that patient that particular treatment. I would never want someone to just give me an answer, you always have to have a rationale behind your answer which comes from reading. I like to get input on other resources people have used that some of us aren't aware of to increase our nursing knowledge

There's absolutely nothing wrong with Googling. If you're going to flat out tell me you don't Google answers I'm going to have to say you're being too narrow and limiting yourself. Google can lead you to reputable sites.

I do realize you asked where to find the information. However, it came off as such a basic question that I was honestly puzzled as to why on earth you needed to know where to find the answer to "what is" questions. Obviously there was more you were wanting "but why" questions - that I simply didn't pick up on and it's probably because I just knew the answer and wasn't on the same page as you. So I do recognize that. However, I will reiterate ... Google is OK if you know how to use it. Don't shut yourself off from a useful supplemental tool. Also, I'm betting you have access to a HUGE database of medical and nursing journals through school. Just throwing out ideas.