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I was offered a position on a BMT unit after a less than 10 minute interview

Oncology   (261 Views | 2 Replies)
by nycnurse25 nycnurse25 (New) New Nurse

32 Profile Views; 1 Post

Hi! I have been a nurse for a year on a Medicine and Cardiac Stepdown unit. I'm interested in getting into oncology and was offered a position on a BMT unit. I spoke with a recruiter briefly and then had a phone interview (due to being in a different state) with the nurse manager and some other higher ups. The interview over the phone was less than 10 minutes and not what I was expecting or what I was used to. Is this a red flag? It seems as though they need people fairly urgently but I don't know many units that don't. I got an offer about 10 minutes after the interview. 

Aside from that concern, my other main concern is how I will adapt from being night shift on a stepdown to day shift on a BMT floor. From what I am reading it sounds quite intense and busy. My patient ratio is 1:3, 1:4 which is what I am used to now on stepdown but it sounds like much more is involved in their care. Any insight/if you think my experience will help? Anything I should study? Thanks in advance! 

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vsheehan has <1 years experience.

21 Posts; 704 Profile Views

In nursing a lot of times our gut tells us there is a problem  before the concrete data shows a problem. Sounds like your gut is telling you something. 

Edited by vsheehan

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OncologyCat has 3 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Medical Hematology/Oncology/Stem Cell Transplant.

76 Posts; 601 Profile Views

I love love love BMT. When I interviewed for my BMT unit the manager told me the pt population on the unit is probably  the second most complex in the hospital (after ICU ofc), and lots of BMT/CAR T pts can go to the ICU during their admission. 1:3 is a typical assignment load for a day shift in a BMT unit. Among all the chemo, blood products, and cell therapy you have to give during the day and the pt can react any minute, it can be busy. Also most of them are neutropenic so dealing with first neutropenic fevers/sepsis is not uncommon. When pt are close to discharge then you need intense education about hime safety and follow up after transplant. 

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