How to survive in LTC

Posted
by 2loves (New) New

Hi,

I have been an RN for one year. I have always worked in a hospital. I love the pay and the residents at this facility. However the staff is rude, loud, and boisterous. They are written up but nothing ever happens due to unionized working conditions. I wasn't properly trained and I don't want to lose my license. I don't want to give up the job, or money I make but I don't want to lose my license either. how do you survive in a ltc facility with multiple deficits?

nursephillyphil, BSN, RN

Specializes in Medical Oncology, ER. Has 5 years experience. 325 Posts

Its all about teamwork, time management, getting to know your patients, and getting a routine down asap.

Sent from my iPhone using all nurses

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 16 years experience. 224 Articles; 27,608 Posts

I wasn't properly trained and I don't want to lose my license.
The 'losing my license' mantra is incredulously overblown, especially when pertaining to LTC facilities. Statistically, nursing licensure revocation happens to nurses who work in acute care hospitals, not LTC facilities.

Moreover, most licensure revocation is the result of drug diversion, theft, impaired practice, failure to fulfill the requirements of the state's impaired nurses program (IPN), or other issues that revolve around addiction.

NurseGirl525, ASN, RN

Specializes in ICU. 3,663 Posts

The 'losing my license' mantra is incredulously overblown, especially when pertaining to LTC facilities. Statistically, nursing licensure revocation happens to nurses who work in acute care hospitals, not LTC facilities.

Moreover, most licensure revocation is the result of drug diversion, theft, impaired practice, failure to fulfill the requirements of the state's impaired nurses program (IPN), or other issues that revolve around addiction.

That's something I was wondering about Commuter. People come on here all the time afraid of losing their licenses. Why is that? I have looked on our state's bon website and most of the stuff I see is for drug diversion. Why would someone think that they would lose their license for doing their job?

HoneyMagnolia

5 Posts

I graduated in 2013 and my nursing instructors drummed "the fear" into us pretty thoroughly - all clinicals were in acute care in a large hospital, no LTC clinicals in my program. Preceptors added to it, both in hospital practicum and on first job in LTC. I think Commuter is right, at least judging by my BON's disciplinary list, unless things are different in other states.

tnmarie

Specializes in geriatrics, hospice, private duty. 268 Posts

That's something I was wondering about Commuter. People come on here all the time afraid of losing their licenses. Why is that? I have looked on our state's bon website and most of the stuff I see is for drug diversion. Why would someone think that they would lose their license for doing their job?

Because your license is always threatened. At least it is here. Starting in nursing school, we were threaten and brow beaten with loss of license. Once you get out of school, DONs generally continue the trend. I don't think I've worked at a place yet where I haven't heard "you better do this/if you don't do this you will lose your license." It's ridiculous and makes me want to post statistics of why nurses lose their licenses just to shut these people up...but then I might lose my license :cheeky:.